Dec 122007
 

,
Title: Detective Dale – TAS

Tagline: In a town with no hope, one no hoper dares to hope.

Project Description: Interactive crime/courtroom drama set in the sleepy backwater town of Jordanville “The Best Place in Tasmania to Live, Work and Play”. Rich local characters and relatively strange going’s on create an enigma spread across the web including the “Church of New Hope: Speed to Salvation”, where the audience are invited to join forces with Dale and uncover a truth stranger than fiction.

Target Media: Web, TV

LAMP VII Couran Cove

LAMP VII Couran Cove

LAMP VII Couran Cove

LAMP VII Couran Cove

LAMP VII Couran Cove

LAMP VII Couran Cove

LAMP VII Couran Cove

LAMP VII Couran Cove

Team Members © Producer Andy Wilson, Writer Ryk Goddard, Writer/Developer Shaun Wilson . Strict Copyright 2007

Guardian Mentor: Arse

LAMP Lab: Couran Cove, Queensland, November 2007

Dec 072007
 

,
Title: Machine – Tasmania

Tagline: Building a better world, one person at a time.

Project Description: MACHINE is a competitive social networking game. Two companies, G.I.C. & pSol, vie for world dominance. Players work their way up the ranks of their chosen company by performing a variety of tasks. Each tasks’ solution has a cause and effect on both companies. Players group to complete tasks which gain them rewards. They will rise up and down the ranks depending on their success. Woven within this game is an underlying story of the two companies separated at a particular moment of history. Players can just play the game to succeed within the ranks or they can delve into the deep, dark world of MACHINE and find out the who, why, where, when… and maybe the how. MACHINE is underpinned by a new type of social networking system with the ability to change and mould not just to fit the MACHINE world, but any other project where social networking becomes more than just your friends list.

Target Media: Social Networks, Games, User Generated, Broadband PC, Console, Mobile
LAMP VII Couran Cove

LAMP VII Couran Cove

LAMP VII Couran Cove

LAMP VII Couran Cove

LAMP VII Couran Cove

LAMP VII Couran Cove

Team Members ©: Writer Chris Rattray, Designer Dion Brooks, Producer/Lead Developer Bruce Moyle. Strict COPYRIGHT 2007

Guardian Mentor: Matt Costello

LAMP Lab: Couran Cove, Queensland, November 2007

Jun 142007
 

Guy Gadney© Guy Gadney 2007. The changes taking place across the industry and growth trends mean we are now creative melting pot where many things are starting to happen simultaneously.

The Presentation

The third of three podcasts from Guy Gadney, Tony Walsh and Gary Hayes recorded live at the at the AGL Theatre, Museum of Sydney (MoS) Thurs 17 May.

TV can I introduce you to Games?

Guy takes a broad look at the changes happening in creative media industries. The importance of broadband to enable virtual worlds and mixed reality services as well as integration to allow rich cross-media entities such as Alternate Reality Games. He looks at some commercial drivers for mixed reality spaces such as home finding, being able to virtually walk into models of physical spaces.

“This sort of programming is fascinating in that not only does the user interact with the story line but builds up their own profile online, matches them across the fictional story world which is being told across 24 to their real location in the US and then throws a community into the mix as well. And like a car cranking we start to get a sense of the beginnings of some quite exciting.”

Guy continues to look at the power of community as creators across mobiles, web and in TV and talks about CSI, 24, L Word (viewer generated script) and Desperate Housewives and the importance of relevant advertising. He looks at growing trends:

“it takes about 7 to 10 years for any new major technology, behavioural technology to filter through to mainstream. If we look at hardware that has come through PCs as they come up to 50%, the growth of DVD players and broadband as it starts to come through there is a linearity associated with that.”

He talks about the growth of gaming platforms, the generations that define them and how they are becoming more and more ubiquitous.

“What we are getting at the moment is all of this stuff coming at once and there is a reason for that I believe. Which is that it has actually been coming for quite some time and if you apply the rule of 7-10 years here is a grab bag of technologies that have come through. Chat, iRC chat was around 1988 now look at where we are with MSN messenger, that is mainstream. RPGs in a new media context started around 1988 as well and MMORPGs started around 1991. 3D browsers started to come through around 1994 with VRML as browser plugins. Mobile content and interactive TV also around 1996/7. Many of these failed first time around in about 1996. If you go mainstream with all of these, guess what they are all hitting about now.”

Guy finishes by talking about the relationship with the customers is about being much closer to them now and in real time and it changes the way we need to relate to them. A consistent narrative must work across commercial services as well as more story driven ARGs, a web experience must be linked to the fax or mobile experience.MP3 recording time 27:46 (10.1 MB) Click to listen

Presentation presented by LAMP @ AFTRS.

PODCAST SUBSCRIPTION

All LAMP podcasts are also published through the iTunes store.

Audio unedited. Text and processing by Gary Hayes

SEMINAR: MIXED REALITY BRANDED ENTERTAINMENT

“Where Social Networks meet Games meet TV”

Which side of the wall are you on? TV and Film OR Games and Virtual Worlds? That wall is about to crumble. This is a wake up call to all entertainment producers and consumers to prepare for an almighty collision.

Audiences are already spending up to four times as much of their entertainment time in virtual spaces than they are watching TV. EA Games have just partnered with Endemol to produce TV shows inside virtual worlds, MTV Networks have virtual versions of their popular TV program Laguna Beach and there is a growing tide of shows from virtual worlds which mirror our experiences in the physical world.

This exciting afternoon seminar will examine a wide range of cross-over services that work between games, virtual worlds and linear TV. This seminar is intended for games creators, social network managers and film and TV producers looking to merge their entertainment worlds. It will also be of interest to designers of games that work across media in the physical world using mobiles, print, viral techniques, TV and the web.

Join:

* Tony Walsh (Emmy Award Winning Canadian Games Developer)
* Guy Gadney (General Manager PBL Digital Services & President AIMIA) and
* Gary Hayes (Director of LAMP and Head of MUVE at The Project Factory)

Guy Gadney

Guy GadneyGuy Gadney has been involved in new media since 1992, and produced his first interactive online story for Penguin Books in 1996. He produced and directed two others in the late nineties that tapped into the power of story-telling as a dialogue rather than a monologue. He produced and co-wrote the MMORPG Diaspora in 1998 with over 50 interwoven storylines which formed the basis of the interactive user-generated game.

He has worked at the BBC, FoxKids, FOXTEL, BigPond and is currently General Manager of Digital Services at PBL Media developing digital strategy for the group companies including ACP Magazines and Channel Nine. He is President of AIMIA, and is involved in a number of companies worldwide who specialise in virtual worlds and interactive narrative.

May 112007
 

MIXED REALITY BRANDED ENTERTAINMENT

Audiences are already spending up to four times as much of their entertainment time in virtual spaces than they are watching TV. EA Games have just partnered with Endemol to produce TV shows inside virtual worlds, MTV Networks have virtual versions of their popular TV program Laguna Beach and there is a growing tide of shows from virtual worlds which mirror our experiences in the physical world.

This exciting afternoon seminar will examine a wide range of cross-over services that work between games, virtual worlds and linear TV. This seminar is intended for games creators, social network managers and film and TV producers looking to merge their entertainment worlds. It will also be of interest to designers of games that work across media in the physical world using mobiles, print, viral techniques, TV and the web.

Join:

  • Tony Walsh (Emmy Award Winning Canadian Games Developer)
  • Guy Gadney (General Manager PBL Digital Services & President AIMIA) and
  • Gary Hayes (Director of LAMP and Head of MUVE at The Project Factory)

at the AGL Theatre, Museum of Sydney (MoS) 1-4pm Thurs 17 May.

Registration for this FREE event is essential. Register here.

Programme:

  • 1.00 PM: Peter Giles “Welcome and Speaker Introductions”
  • 1.05 PM: Gary Hayes “Welcome to Mixed Reality?”
  • 1.20 PM: Tony Walsh “The Real, The Virtual and The Mixed”
  • 2.20 PM: Break
  • 2.30 PM: Guy Gadney “TV can I introduce you to Games?”
  • 3.10 PM: Panel Discussion & Audience Q&A. Mod Gary Hayes
  • 4.00 PM: Close

Speakers:

Tony Walsh
Tony WalshTony Walsh is a Toronto-based creative developer and consultant with a background in professional illustration, writing, and design. He has helped plan and build compelling social media and game projects since 1994, including the Gemini Award-winning “This is Daniel Cook” web site (2005), International Emmy Award-winning “Regenesis” alternate reality game (2006), and the SXSW Web Award-winning “Fallen” alternate reality game (2007).

Walsh is a part-time Game Design instructor with Centennial College (undergraduate program) and George Brown College (postgraduate program) in Toronto. In 2007, he conducted game prototyping workshops for the Canadian Film Centre Media Lab in Toronto, joined Australia’s Laboratory of Advanced Media Production as a mentor for a series of workshops based around the “Story of the Future,” and joined San Francisco’s Producers Institute for New Media Technologies as a mentor for a week of new media production workshops. Walsh is a member of the “Pool of Masterminds,” a group of consultants and educators working with the Interactive / Media / Design program at the Royal Academy of Art in The Hague, The Netherlands. Walsh is an Advisory Board member for the South by Southwest Screenburn game conference in Austin, Texas.

Walsh maintains an active public profile by giving presentations, contributing to panel discussions, and by commentating in the media. He has been filmed for two pending documentaries about virtual worlds, and has consulted two other pending documentaries on the same topic. In March, 2007, Walsh lead a panel discussion on “Avatar-Based Marketing in Virtual Worlds” at the Screenburn game conference. In 2006, he moderated a top-rated panel on “The Secret Sex Life of Video Games” at South by Southwest. Walsh has been cited in such publications as Wired Magazine, Discover Magazine, Utne Magazine, and Harvard Business Review.

Walsh is interested generally in the intersections between culture, business, and technology. Specifically, he finds virtual worlds such as Second Life among the most exciting results of those intersections. He has been researching and writing about Second Life since 2004. His blog Clickable Culture is recognized as one of the world’s most interesting sources for virtual-world criticism and analysis.

Tony Walsh can be found online at www.SecretLair.com.

Guy Gadney

Guy GadneyGuy Gadney has been involved in new media since 1992, and produced his first interactive online story for Penguin Books in 1996. He produced and directed two others in the late nineties that tapped into the power of story-telling as a dialogue rather than a monologue. He produced and co-wrote the MMORPG Diaspora in 1998 with over 50 interwoven storylines which formed the basis of the interactive user-generated game.

He has worked at the BBC, FoxKids, FOXTEL, BigPond and is currently General Manager of Digital Services at PBL Media developing digital strategy for the group companies including ACP Magazines and Channel Nine. He is President of AIMIA, and is involved in a number of companies worldwide who specialise in virtual worlds and interactive narrative.

GARY HAYES

Gary HayesGary is currently Director of LAMP @ AFTRS and Head of MUVE Development at UK based The Project Factory. After joining the BBC in London as an editor Gary quickly moved on to lead the BBC’s development of the internet, interactive TV and emerging platforms from 95-04 as Senior Producer and Development Manager. He devised & produced many of the BBC’s ‘firsts’ – Digital Text, the first broadcast interactive TV service – ‘Nomad’ the first live internet documentary – ‘X-Creatures’ the first broadband TV service and in ’96 introduced the first video and audio onto the BBC’s internet sites. He also produced and devised over 20 other eTV and broadband TV services including Top of the Pops, Travel Show, State Apart and several future BBC cross-platform navigators. Gary created numerous courses and seminars on Interactive thinking for linear producers, was active in the Blue Sky Imagineering and R&D depts and was a leading part of BBC strategy teams from 2001 in preparing for on-demand, cross-platform services.

Living & consulting in the US during 2004-5 he line produced Showtime’s PVR enhanced L-Word, as part of AFI digital labs and devised a range of new on-demand program formats for two national TV networks. Gary also produced & chaired conferences around LA including Hollywood industry panel seminars and Digital Days both looking at emerging media super-distribution models. He also chaired the Business Models Group from 99-03 for TV-Anytime (the lead media-on-demand standards body) and co-authored a Department Trade and Industry Report on Personal Video Systems. He has been an International Interactive Emmy juror for the past two years.

Gary is also currently building and devising commercial and game-like services for virtual worlds, having recently produced and built both Telstra and ABC Second Life presences in Second Life. He runs workshops in multi user virtual environments for cinematographers, designers, script writers and directors exploring the potential of shared social online virtual spaces for collaborative production, creativity and education. He is speaking about brand opportunities in Virtual Worlds at CeBit Australia, The 8th National Public Affairs Conference, and The Australian Interactive Media Industry Association amoungst others. He runs a fictional MUVE blog JustVirtual and a renowned blog on media personalisation, digital brands, new media forms and creativity at www.personalizemedia.com. As a published music producer, composer and performer he has had over 200 works performed live and on TV/Film and Radio.

PETER GILES

Peter GilesPeter has worked as the Head of the Digital Media Department since 1998 and has established Australia’s leading postgraduate and professional programs in Visual Effects, Interactive Media, Broadcast Design and Computer Animation. The Department has produced short films that have won both Australian and international awards for artistic and technical excellence.

Prior to joining the AFTRS Peter worked as Digital Media Manager for Metro Screen where he initiated programs to develop the skills of new and emerging filmmakers. He managed a wide range of innovative production workshops in partnership with organisations including the Loud Youth Festival, IBM, the Australian Film Commission, the NSW Film and Television Office, ABC Online, SBS TV, the Performance Space, the Australian Centre for Photography and the Australian Network for Art and Technology.

Peter has developed digital media curriculum and taught workshops at the University of Sydney, the University of Technology, Sydney, Griffith University and the Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane.

Over the past 15 years Peter has produced projects for radio, television, film and interactive media. His video artwork has been exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Sydney and the Institute of Contemporary Art in London. Peter is a well known commentator on digital media and is currently the Chair of the Sydney Chapter of ACM SIGGRAPH, the leading computer graphics industry body.

Image Text:

Free Seminar: 1-4PM Thursday 17 May 2007. AGL Theatre, Museum of Sydney

MIXED REALITY BRANDED ENTERTAINMENT

“Where Social Networks meet Games meet TV”

Which side of the wall are you on? TV and Film OR Games and Virtual Worlds? That wall is about to crumble. This is a wake up call to all entertainment producers and consumers to prepare for an almighty collision.

Nov 102006
 

Project description: The Deep Sleep is an interactive neo-noir mystery set in the animated world of 15 year old narcoleptic dunce, Lemmy Cue. When Lemmy unearths a shocking crime that he may or may not have committed, our 15-25 year old audience must uncover clues and solve the mystery. This 13 x 5 minute weekly television and digital interactive television series and immersive online world evolves into a rich interactive online adventure. Help save Lemmy and uncover the dark truth behind the strange goings-on in Turnerville.

Deep 22

Deep 09

Deep 21

Deep 12

Deep 20

Deep Team

Team Members
Hugh Sullivan – Series Producer/Writer/Director
Kate Croser – Producer
Jindou Lee – Designer

Guardian mentor/s: Jackie Turnure
LAMP Lab: October 2006
Target media: Mobile, Broadband, Interactive TV
Hugh Sullivan © 2006

Aug 072006
 

Immersion: Designing Experience © Gary Hayes 2006.

The fourth of 8 podcasts recorded live during the LAMP lab on Milson Island, Sydney in July 2006 – in front of the eight teams and ten mentors developing emerging media projects.

gary hayes“think of the experience, not just the service, the differentiators between professionals, thats you, versus users is that you should be very adept at creating user experiences versus creating individual pieces of content. I don’t think users in the future will be creating rich interconnected narratives across platforms and time”

Gary gives an informal and demo rich (hence a few breaks) talk about how to design pervasive entertainment, user experiences. By briefly looking at the eight areas below, using it as a rough framework, he attempts to dissect the interactive experience. He uses a range of examples from interactive services he helped create or produce such as X-Creatures, Top of the Pops, The L Word and virtual environments in Second Life through to games such as Indigo Prophecy and cross-media services including Da Vinci Code. He refers to the importance of flow and making sure the scale of the experience doesn’t feel limited by allowing viewers to take part in the creation process itself.

1 SCALE:
…of the experience. The size of the screen and the amount of story world to explore has enormous impacts on immersion – as well as the detail of individual objects within the ‘world’.
Ask: How big is my story world?

2. ESCAPISM (play)
In terms of building ‘play’ – it should be as fun making it as doing it.Today the experience author has to create tools for play, rather than fixed media and fixed routes through it. Randomness can go someway there – but for true immersion through play, give people tools to create their own variants of your property.
Ask: Can users really play in my creation?

3. SENSES
…the amount of senses that are engaged by an experience gives it the most potential for immersion. Make sure as well as intellectual and emotional engagement you consider sounds and the aesthetics of visual grammar and simm (simultaneous media usage). On a social network level – be aware that humans are extremely aware of
machine vs human interaction.
Ask: Are the visuals and audio truly rich and compelling?

4. PERSPECTIVE
…does the story or narrative engage? This is obvious, if there is nothing for you to be drawn along by (even your own story in some cases) then you will switch off. Put your audience inside the protagonist’s head.
Ask: How can I get the user to ‘empathise’ and BE a story world character

5. SERENDIPITY
…how the world or show you are watching has elements of surprise. The more scripted and formulaic the less immersive. An unspoilt new film at the cinema can surprise, social networks are and should be as unpredictable as life, sadly ‘most’ TV and pop-music are at the other end of the scale.
Ask: Do I really have anything that will surprise?

6. TEMPORALITY

How real time does the experience feel? Are you swept along by real time events, that are part of a social network and also are your choices taking place when you want them to. Sometimes on-demand is far less compelling than real time, online game and social network.
Ask: How ‘live’ does the service feel?

7. PERSONALIZATION

How much can you minutely affect the world and yourself in it? How much will the world reflect you for being there? Most importantly, how much of your real world personality can you bring with you into the experience. It is all about making the world feel like you belong – and TOOLS, TOOLS, TOOLS
Ask: Is each user given an individual user journey, can they roll their own?

8. RESONANCE AND CHOICE

How much control or agency do you have over the experience? Are your actions permanent and seen by all? Can you really do and say what you want – freedom of choice. True resonance is like a virtuous circle, you do something and there is a response that forever changes the environment. Like real life.
Ask: Can my service change based on user input?

He also mentions that having embedded social networks inside you experience is as important as any content you may think of including in your user experience project –
“think of your service as a tool, think of it as a place to play”.

For more background on this presentation check out Gary’s blog Immersion: Ambient TV, Addictive MMORPG

and to download the 2.2MB PDF of the presentation click here

PODCAST SUBSCRIPTION
All LAMP podcasts are also published through the iTunes store.

GARY HAYES – Interaction Producer & Director LAMP@AFTRS

Gary Hayes has been at the forefront of worldwide emerging media development and production since 1993. After joining the BBC in London as an editor he quickly moved on to lead the BBC’s development of the internet, interactive TV and emerging platforms from 95-04 as Senior Producer and Development Manager. The BBC grew from a linear broadcaster to world leader in cross-platform services during this period.

Gary devised & produced many of the BBC’s ‘firsts’ – Digital Text, the first broadcast interactive TV service – ‘Nomad’ the first live internet documentary – ‘X-Creatures’ the first broadband TV service and in ‘96 introduced the first video and audio onto the BBC’s internet sites. He also produced and devised over 20 other eTV and broadband TV services including Top of the Pops, Travel Show, State Apart and several future BBC cross-platform navigators. Gary created numerous courses and seminars on Interactive thinking for linear producers, was active in the Imagineering and R&D depts and was a leading part of BBC strategy teams from 2001 in preparing for on-demand, cross-platform services. He also chaired the Business Models Group from 99-03 for TV-Anytime (the lead media-on-demand standards body).

Living & consulting in the US during 2004 he line produced Showtime’s PVR enhanced L-Word, as part of AFI digital labs and devised a range of new on-demand program formats for two national TV networks. Gary also produced & chaired conferences around LA including Hollywood industry panel seminars and Digital Days both looking at emerging media super-distribution models. He has presented at over fifty major international conferences and written several consultancy papers including US Interactive TV Advertising and more recently a report for the DTI on Personal Video Enablers for the UK media industry. He runs a blog on Media Personalisation, Digital Business and Creativity at www.personalizemedia.com

Gary is also currently exploring the potential of shared social online virtual spaces for collaborative production, creativity and education. A specialist in personalised digital TV over broadcast and broadband networks Gary evangelises on the empowerment potential of non-passive media. As a published music producer, composer and performer he has had over 200 works performed live and on TV and Radio.

Sydney 3 July 2006 – Time 27:26. Click to listen

Jul 262006
 

Emergence
Tagline: “Build Your Own Human Being”
LAMP Lab: July 2006

LAMP IV Photo C Gleeson

Target platforms: Web, Virtual Environments, Broadband TV, IPTV, Mobile

Project description: ‘Emergence’ is an innovative cross-platform work in which users are given the chance to collectively build their ideal human being. Once genetic engineering has perfected the manipulation of physical characteristics, it will turn its sights onto the perfection of personality. But what sort of character traits would we want an ideal human being to have? ‘Emergence’ gives users the opportunity to answer these questions by working together to create their own version of an ideal being. The interactive audio-visual theatre component of ‘Emergence’ will premiere at the Sydney Opera House in mid-2007 and then tour nationally. At the same time, users will also be able to build their ideal beings online, in virtual environments and through the broadband TV platform.

LAMP IV

LAMP IV

LAMP IV

LAMP IV

LAMP IV

LAMP IV

Team Members
Mark Bolotin – Director
Joshua Wodak – Multimedia Co-ordinator (Technical Director)
Michelle Tabone – Interactive / Content Producer
Guardian Mentor: Gary Hayes

All IP, Content and Images by Synarcade Audio-Visuals © 2006

Jul 252006
 

Evolving Technology, where will your audience be? © Jonathan Marshall 2006.

The second of 8 podcasts recorded live during the LAMP lab on Milson Island, Sydney in July 2006 – in front of the eight teams and ten mentors developing emerging media projects. International mentor Jonathan talks about new technologies and how we engage audiences with them.
jonathan marshall“Choose the platform based on the audience and their likely location. Think about how each user will move between each platform and don’t choose a platform just for the sake of it”

After an entertaining rope trick showing how TV, mobile and broadband penetration will invert itself over the next few years Jonathan continues by looking at the technological transitions that are taking place at the moment. He looks at the emerging cross-over potential of TV and PC becoming IPTV, of TV and Mobile becoming DVB-H (one flavour of mobile TV) and ‘download’ possibilities as mobiles become as powerful as current PC’s.

Jonathan investigates the shift and flattening of audience demand for content as multicast becomes unicast – traditional broadcast turns into personalised individually available global streamed channels and pots of content over peer-to-peer networks. He asks the age old question is broadcast dead and says it will always have a place from a pure distribution efficiency perspective and shows how it will fit into the three way mix of broadband, broadcast and mobile networks. He ends by talking about future devices and how storage will be ubiquitous and the tools to find content to put onto that storage will become absolutely critical. (During the q&a session there is a discussion about the transition from broadband to PC to IPTV and how broadcasters and telecos are preparing for the fight ahead).

PODCAST SUBSCRIPTION
All LAMP podcasts are also published through the iTunes store.

JONATHAN MARSHALL

Jonathan Marshall is one of the key technical strategists in the field of interactive TV, having led the development of the BBC’s first groundbreaking services on DTT and Digital Satellite. Jonathan started his career at the BBC in 1991 as a recording engineer for BBC Scotland. He then left to complete a degree in Electronics and Music followed by a Masters in French and Management. By combining these skills he worked in Paris for IRCAM designing and implementing Digital Music Workstations for contemporary composers and performers to use.Jonathan rejoined the BBC in 1996 working firstly on DAB and then Digital Television for the Research and Development department at Kingswood Warren. It was here that he developed the world’s first interactive TV broadcasts in MHEG. In 1999 Jonathan joined the newly created BBC Interactive TV department at Bush House, where he worked with the technical team in delivering a whole raft of services, including the BAFTA award winning Wimbledon Interactive and Digital Text services on the Sky Platform. This work cemented his reputation as one of the key technical strategists in the interactive TV field. Jonathan went on to become BBC Interactive TV’s main technical interface for all third party providers, testing and appraising their products, giving him an unrivalled knowledge of the interactive TV tools market.

Jonathan now works as a freelance Technical Development Producer working with a range of new media companies from start-ups to multi-nationals. As part of his work he delivers training courses both within the BBC and around the world to enable content producers to deliver world class interactive services using the latest technical innovations.

Sydney 4 July 2006 – Time 20:54. PDF (191k) of presentation
Click to listen

Audio edit, description and mp3 prep/post  – G Hayes

May 232006
 

Web 2.0, TV 2.0 © David Jensen 2006
Recorded live and unedited during the LAMP lab in Perth in May 2006 in front of the seven teams developing emerging media projects.

David JensenDavid helps us understand what broadband TV really is and talks about the future of branded entertainment and how this now more important than networks or publishers. He continues with references to the new content over broadband networks, televisual design and raises questions – “what is the content? who owns it? how do we make it? how do we borrow from past media production that inform our practise in this new world? – Content that is 3 minutes long and two hours wide”.

David includes a demo and insight into his companies tool for rich media publishing across multiple platforms called Zetools. This can be used by traditional media companies to create and package their video content or in the future by users to effectively create their own media channels with rich interconnected supplementary content that can be aimed at monetization. The tools are aimed at media professionals who need an easier route to market over IPTV and broadband TV or PC. He takes us through a recent Telemundo ‘murder mystery’ project that used his tools to realise the project quickly. David finishes with advice on how to produce innovative content and differentiate yourself in the market place and achieve success. Such as Left/Right Brain – get all aspects of production working together. Blue Sky, reality, business, creative etc: Competitive analysis – how can you do it better? Candidate testing, peer review and baking in effective business models and much more.

PODCAST SUBSCRIPTION
All LAMP podcasts are also published through the iTunes store.

David Jensen’s 15 years of experience in the delivery of information, interactive media and entertainment has made him a leading member of many industries. He built and led Razorfish’s Broadband / Future Television practice, in addition to managing Razorfish’s Media and Entertainment practice for North America. Under his leadership, his team helped more than 100 media companies with technology, strategy and branding solutions. Clients include: Sony, Disney, DirecTV, I-Blast, News Corp, Fox, HBO, RAI, and Vivendi/Universal. He is currently head of business development for Zetools, an enterprise media company where he oversees all sales, marketing and alliances. Zetools systems enable rich media, multi-platform publishing, creative scheduling and flexible branding.

Prior to Razorfish, Mr. Jensen worked in the education sector creating interactive and community network initiatives for the world’s largest operating foundation, the J. Paul Getty Trust. Projects ranged from building community networks to launching broadband and interactive television channels for education. David has also produced and designed films, music videos, interactive media and television for HBO, MTV, Universal, PBS, Fox and Alive, among others. Mr. Jensen holds a M. Arch. from Harvard University and a B.Sc. from the University of Houston.

Perth 8 May 2006
Click to listen

May 222006
 

Disruption, Changing Audiences and New Business Models © Duane Varan 2006.

Recorded live and unedited during the LAMP lab in Perth in May 2006 in front of the seven teams developing emerging media projects. Length 51 minutes.

Duane Varan“The best thing you can do as content producers is to break your dependency on the Australian market, a very hard thing to do, but you have got to do it to remain in step with the global economy”. Duane Varan talks about the market disruption facing the current TV industry from a range of perspectives including the advertiser, broadcaster, independent producer and the audiences. Looking at other disruptive technologies over the last 50 years he talks about the implications of remote control, timeshifting, interactive TV and video-on-demand then highlights the blunt instruments used at the moment to measure TV viewing. The economic paradigm of TV is shifting, economies of scale no longer work and value is now about producing different goods across platforms and creating engagement.

Duane suggests that the challenge now is about programme promotion, getting your content into the box or the portal and he continues by looking at recent research in how interactivity, especially interactive ads significantly increase engagement. Also touching on interactive storytelling he points out that advertisers not programme makers are way ahead and new business opportunities are being overlooked. In the q and a session he eloquently suggests the Australian market is irrelevant on the global stage to the big brands and that government protecting the status quo in Australia (denying disruption) is hindering real business development opportunities. Duane finishes by talking about global brands, IPTV and the future of the Australian industry.

PODCAST SUBSCRIPTION
All LAMP podcasts are also published through the iTunes store.

Professor Duane Varan is Director of the Interactive Television Research Institute at Murdoch University where he holds the Foundation Chair in New Media. Professor Varan is the recepient of a wide range of presitigous awards including the Australian Prime Miniter’s Award for University Teacher of the Year (2001), the Australian Award for University Teaching in Economics, Business and Related Studies (2001), a Texas Excellence in Teaching Award (1990) and an Asia-Pacfici ITT Award of Excellence in recognition of his contributions towards bridging the gap between business strategy, information technology and creative design. Professor Varan is a global authority on the nascent digital television industry. His clients include Procter and Gamble, Nike, Pizza Hut, the BBC, BSkyB (UK), TV Cabo (Portugal), Leo Burnett, Saatchi and Saatchi and other broadcasters, telcos, advertisers and global brands.

Perth 8 May 2006
Click to listen