Jan 212010
 

As we ended the last decade we were collating/archiving assets from the LAMP site and think it important to recognise the people that made LAMP the Australian icon in effective emerging media development.

Many of the mentors and participants were beginning their own journey on these workshops and residentials and are now leading the industry in Australia and abroad. We hope these ‘retrospective’ posts serve as a record for that which follows LAMP.

LAMP 2005-2009 was:

Continue reading »

Jan 192009
 

This LAMP mentored project from Marcus Gillezeau and Ellenor Cox (of Firelight Productions) has been nominated in the Fiction category of the 2009 International Interactive Emmy Awards. These awards are held at Milia in Cannes each year and this year it is from 30 March to 3 April. The video below with a voice over by Marcus himself, explains Scorched and is also used by judges to help select the nominations.

Through these awards, the International Academy of Television Arts & Sciences is celebrating a significantly growing sector of the television industry and recognize excellence in content created and designed for viewer interaction and/or delivery on a digital platform.

Fiction category

  • Director’s Cut – The Revenge, Container Group S.A., Argentina
  • Kirill, Endemol UK / MSN , United Kingdom
  • Pietshow, Grundy UFA TV Produktions GmbH, Germany
  • Scorched, Firelight Productions in association with Essential Media & Goalpost Pictures, Australia

Scorched has also recently been nominated for the local Australian AIMIA awards – all nominations here.

About the video “Scorched is one of the largest all-media, interactive drama projects ever in Australia, screening across the Internet, mobile devices and prime time TV. Find out more about how the team put together the roll-out of the project.”

Scorched has received a great deal of attention and commentary from press and also those closer to the project. This is the LAMP post about the launch, here is Guy Gadney (then head of PBL New Media, Channel 9) and Gary Hayes (LAMP Director’s personal media blog).

It is great news that another LAMP connected project is entered into the International Emmy’s – examples of earlier ones included the winner of the Ogilvy Amex award by then LAMP mentor Jackie Turner and other LAMP projects such as  The Deep Sleep won development awards too.

Nov 092008
 

GameJam 2008 was run at AFTRS in Sydney on 1 November and featured talks to do with developing for or playing with console, pc games or online games. Creating and using virtual worlds, games, film cross-over, machinima, writing, AI and educational, fun or just plain cool stuff.

gamejam04

Below is a selection of those captured on the day including a short item related to three new courses AFTRS are offering in 2008 featuring Previsualisation elements – Animation Directing, Games and Virtual Worlds.

1 Guy Gadney “The Life of an MMORPG Diaspora”

Guy takes us on a personal tour of one of the first ‘grass roots’ online games as he tells the story of Diaspora. MP3 recording 6.9MB Click to listen

2 Dan Graf “Story and Game”

Dan gives a thoughtful talk about the conceptual framework of film or book to game adaptation. He talks about experiential design and audience centric focus when you plan your interactive version. An interesting session at the end when Ian Brown joins the discussion and  the perennial issue of narrative vs play is brought to the fore again. MP3 recording 13.4MB Click to listen

3 Peter Giles “Future of Game Education”

Peter looks at many of the issues that are facing educators and academic institutions as they begin to consider games as a core part of curriculum. MP3 recording 5.6MB Click to listen

4 Physical TV “You Are Going To Die”

Karen Pearlman and Richard James Allen are the creators of a cross-media property called Thursday’s Fiction. They worked with Gary Hayes on the virtual world aspect of the project and talk more about where the proposition is headed as it moves into game space. MP3 recording 6.4MB Click to listen

5 Marigo Raftopoulos “Galapagos: Serious Game”

Marigo introduces us to her serious game concept to help businesses understand the benefits of thinking about the environment. MP3 recording 4.9MB Click to listen

6 Brett Robertson “History of Games”

Brett takes us on a light hearted trip down memory lane and also at the current state of the games industry. MP3 recording 7.9MB Click to listen

7 Ian Brown “Portal, Have Your Cake and Eat It Too”

Ian takes us behind the scenes from a user and passionate fan perspective of one of the most unique games to have become commercial, portal. He also looks at the original game, Narbuncular Drop, designed by students that Valve used to develop Portal. MP3 recording 7.4MB Click to listen

8 Michela Ledwidge “MOD the Movies!”

Michela takes us deep into Sanctuary and the thinking behind allowing the audience to customise, mash-up and generally Mod cinematic content. MP3 recording 7.4MB Click to listen

9 Gary Hayes “Reality & Pleasure – State of Play of Blended Real Life, TV and Game World” Vod/Podcast

This video above available as a download (with better audio & creative commons) 50MB MP4 click here

LAMP PODCASTS

All LAMP podcasts are published through iTunes – click on the icon below if you have iTunes to subscribe now!

ABOUT LAMP PODCASTS

  • This podcast presentation by LAMP @ AFTRS.
  • Audio recorded by Gary Hayes & Brett Robertson
  • Description, editing, podcasting and production by Gary Hayes

Finally a short compilation capture edited by Peter Giles (note video has camera sound, podcasts are higher quality direct lapel mikes).

Aug 132008
 

Matt Costello 02SCORCHED is Australia’s first ‘what-if’ disaster telemovie. – “The Year is 2012 and Australia has run out of water.”

There is a lot more than meets the eye to Scorched, destined to be Australia’s biggest landmark doco-drama event this year. The social media, community generated story elements that build up to and after the 90 minute tele-feature being transmitted on Chn 9 in December have been work-shopped through LAMP workshops, on-going consultancy and the 3rd residential in Perth back in 2006.

Marcus Gillezeau and Ellenor Cox are the co-directors of Firelight, the creators of this groundbreaking drama format. They are wonderful example of leading independent producers who have embraced the significance of creating entertainment that spreads across platforms and time but also draws in content from the audience and makes the whole ‘experience’ more collaborative and engaging.

The surrounding online service is a hybrid of an Alternate Reality Game, an Episodic drama delivered via social media sites (such as Facebook and YouTube) and a range of fake (faux) websites that are part of the futuristic element of the story. The main hub site is CPN News, a 24-hour live news channel broadcasting stories from 2012 and including many of the lead characters – these include notable actors Vince Colosimo, Georgie Parker, Rachel Carpani, Cameron Daddo and Les Hill. You can already follow one of the characters, Cassie, on her own YouTube channel Cassie Has Dreams – which follows her ‘accelerated’ story up to the beginning of the tele-movie. More from the team and the official press release below. More coverage here:

Good luck on this project, there will be a great deal of expertise gained from this journey – for audience and producers alike!

SCORCHED is a groundbreaking all-media event incorporating television, online and user generated content that will revolutionise the way Australian’s engage with television drama. A gripping 90 minute tele-feature broadcast on the Nine Network will be augmented by an extensive 8 week interactive online drama series that will lead into and ultimately conclude the drama surrounding an ensemble of characters who find themselves engulfed by raging bushfires in a futuristic Sydney that has, due to the effects of global warming, completely run out of water.

In the two months leading up to the TV broadcast of SCORCHED the audience are invited into this future world-without-water through www.scorched.tv (which will be promoted and co-located at ninemsn). Upon entering this online world the audience is introduced to CPN News, a futuristic 24-hour live news station broadcasting stories from 2012. Our CPN news anchors guide the audience through the headline stories of the week focusing attention on how the ongoing drought and water scarcity across Australia has permeated all aspects of life as we know it. CPN’s main reporter Susan Shapiro (Rachel Carpani) is one of the main characters in the tele-feature. Many of Susan’s online interviews are with characters the audience will again meet in the TV broadcast.

CPN encourages the audience to send in stories and videos of what life is like for them in these hard times. These videos and postings are a featured part of the www.scorched.tv website and provide a novel way for the online community to interact with the future and see their offerings posted on a high-profile website. CPN also points viewers to their featured viewer of the week – Cassie Hoffman, an 18-year-old girl living in Bourke who has become obsessed with diarising her life on her website ‘Cassie Has Dreams’ to compensate for the loneliness of being one of the few remaining teenagers left in her dying town. The audience can interact with Cassie and the other characters via email, watch faux news reports and read numerous stories which set the scene on a national and global level

With potential synergies alongside Jane McGonigal’s Superstruct (“the world has 23 years left” collaborative ARG) happening in similar timeframe, SCORCHED is produced for the Nine Network by Goalpost Pictures Australiaand Essential Media and Entertainment, in association with FirelightProductions. It is financed by the Nine Network, Granada International, the Film Finance Corporation, the New South Wales Film and Television Office and the Australian Film Commission, and was developed through the Australian Film Television & Radio School’s Laboratory of Advanced Media Production (LAMP).

FIRELIGHT PRODUCTIONS SHINES LIGHT ON ALL-MEDIA SCREEN CONTENT CREATION

Firelight Productions are the original concept creators behind the multi-platform delivery of Scorched, a major 90-minute feature-length television and online event that will be broadcast via the Internet and on Nine Network Australia.

Scorched, produced by Goalpost Pictures Australia and Essential Media and Entertainment, in association with Firelight Productions, will revolutionise the way Australian’s engage with television drama. A gripping 90 minute tele-feature will be augmented by an extensive 8 week online drama series that will lead into, provide clues for, and ultimately conclude the drama surrounding an ensemble of characters who find themselves engulfed by raging bushfires in a futuristic Sydney that has, due to the effects of global warming, completely run out of water.

Starring Cameron Daddo, Vince Colosimo, Rachel Carpani and Georgie Parker, the Scorched experience will include the most sophisticated and comprehensive cross-platform element yet created for a television event in this country. The interactive online component will launch in mid August, leading up to the tele-feature broadcast later in the year.

Co-directors of Firelight Productions, Ellenor Cox and Marcus Gillezeau, who engineered the cross-platform delivery of Scorched over 2 years, are enthusiastic screen content creators with all-media capabilities who are at the cutting edge of cross-platform content generation in Australia. Their business began in 1997 as a production company specialising in adventure and social political documentaries for international television, but is now focused primarily on all-media projects after the couple identified a considerable niche in the marketplace.

Gillezeau states, “The emergence of new screen technologies created strong demand on content that can deliver across a multitude of platforms. In addition to that, audience interactivity has become paramount to engaging the widest possible audience. Firelight has spent a number of years researching and experimenting in all-media content. Scorched is a breakthrough all-media event that is the culmination of our work to date in this area.”

Scorched is their flagship project, financed by Nine, Granada International, the Film Finance Corp, the New South Wales Film and Television Office and the Australian Film Commission, and developed through the Australian Film Television & Radio School’s Laboratory of Advanced Media Production (LAMP), which is Australia’s premier emerging media research and development production lab.

“When we started to develop the all-media concept for Scorched there was little that had been done before in Australia that combined such an extensive new media proposition with such a significant television offering as a prime time movie on Australia’s leading network.” says Cox. “We looked at overseas projects and were really making it up as we went along. The knowledge we have gained about all-media delivery through developing Scorched now informs all of our future projects and Firelight has become a leader in cross platform content creation.”

Scorched hooks the viewer in with an intriguing conservation message – the reality of global warming makes the idea of a city that has run out of water seem a likely possibility. Gillezeau and Cox wanted to bring to the mainstream audience’s attention the issues of water scarcity and drought in Australia but needed to find a way of making these subjects seem ‘sexy and entertaining’. Hence the concept of Scorched was borne. In the weeks leading up to the Scorched television broadcast, audiences are invited into this future world without water through www.scorched.tv to meet Cassie Hoffman – an 18-year-old girl living in Bourke who has become obsessed with diarising her life on her website ‘Cassie Has Dreams’ to compensate for the loneliness of being one of the few remaining teenagers left in her dying town.

Gillezeau explains, “Once you enter www.scorched.tv, you can follow a serialised drama (60 minutes of 2-3 minute webisodes) which unfolds on a daily basis. The prequel drama takes the viewer right up to the very first scene of the telemovie. Web enthusiasts will be able to participate in an interactive conspiracy-style investigation online, which will arm them with bonus material with which to enjoy one of the unfolding storylines in the telemovie when it airs. After the TV broadcast the drama continues with the sequel to the online story and continuing news reports.”

Firelight is currently supervising producer on Storm Surfers, Dangerous Banks – a documentary about big wave pro-surfers that will also have a significant cross platform delivery. Storm Surfers, financed by Red Bull, the New South Wales Film and TV Office, Discovery Networks Asia and Off The Fence (Netherlands) is one of the first documentary projects in Australia to utilise the new producer’s tax offset. It will air on the Discovery Network, prior to which fans and surfers from all over the world will be able to follow their heroes’ journey comprehensively online and, like the pro-surfers themselves, track the storm that will generate the big waves, and ultimately predict when the waves will hit.

Firelight’s mission is to produce innovative programming for all-media, multi-platform delivery, and to remain at the forefront of cross platform screen content creation in Australia and internationally. Upcoming projects include the interactive online drama series Innocent which follows the story of 6 accused young drug traffickers and the reality TV series Kids in Charge where a team of tweens has 10 days to deliver a Rock show spectacle.

Marcus Gillezeau is also the author of the critically acclaimed book ‘Hands On – A practical guide to production and technology in Film, TV and New Media’. The book has been an instant hit at universities and several major conferences across the country.

Since 1997 Firelight have produced more than 20 programs and series including My Home Your War (SBS), Cave in the Snow (SBS), Breaking Bows and Arrows (SBS), The Artist The QC & The Refugee (ABC), Painting with Light in a Dark World (SBS) and Afrika: Cape Town to Cairo (ABC and National Geographic). In 2001 they produced Australia’s first fully convergent, multi-platform documentary project Little Dove Big Voyage for Network 7.  Their films have won numerous international and domestic awards and have screened all over the world on television and in film festivals.

For more information, please contact:

Angie Fielder
angiefielder@iinet.net.au
0403 819 644

Jun 232008
 

A rough transcript of a presentation Gary Hayes (LAMP Director) gave as part of the Digital Content Session at the Trilateral KANZ Broadband Summit in Seoul on 19 June 2008. It looks at the emerging nature of Social Media Entertainment but focuses on how creative professionals can keep up with ‘the crowd’. Covers how Film, TV and Radio are early types of non-participatory, localised, social media content but interactive digital experiences are inherently global. LAMP, forward thinking companies and other Australian initiatives develops new multi-platform services that reach out to international markets – video sharing communities, social virtual worlds, alternate reality games, locative stories, simulations and newer hybrid forms. Gary looks at Australian successes of the collision of animation, online games, film, mobile, broadband web and social media applications and the potential for co-development and cross-training between NZ, Korea and Australia. Transcript below the SlideShare embed

Innovating Global Social Media Experiences and Collaborative Entertainment Production © Gary Hayes 2008

An nyoung, Hello

Thank you for inviting me to speak at this Kanz Broadband Summit this morning and I hope I can inspire collaborative action in us all. My talk is based around one key premise that those who we used to call ‘our audience’ are now empowered and creating, I would suggest, more compelling relevant and original content than ‘us’ so-called creative professionals. I look at how the creative content industry can become relevant again and innovate global social media experiences and particularly how collaborative creative development between cultures and countries can bring back the initiative. I will also touch on the fact that the real paradigm shift of broadband is not about technology but about enabling creative collaboration in social groups (the industry and audience). I use the ‘them and us’ metaphor for ease of presentation because of course they are us!

Don’t worry this is not another ‘community-created-content-will-take-over the world’ talk, there have been many of those because that has already happened, this is about a co-creative society sharing it’s media and creating tools to make the process much easier. A high bandwidth wired up world gives them the many-to-many distribution channels and with community created tools for self-publishing they are entertaining each other and creating flexible companies with a skilled and transient human resource. What does this mean for industry and creative professionals? The good news is that ‘they’, are showing industry (inside and across national borders) the best processes in how to create original and innovative content. We, the creative professionals must take note – be as flexible, fleet of foot and inventive as the ‘crowd’ are becoming.

We are hard wiring the world and humans when given the means to communicate over open, high bandwidth channels will share their stories and develop loyal followings from 100s to 100 000s of those who want to be engaged by them. Trying to regulate and halt the growth of social media will also be at our peril. Force majeure will mean ‘they’ will develop their own connected communities with or without telcos, governments or entertainment companies. But that is another story, what remains are new, niche ‘born to be wired’ communities of interest mashing-up content, engineering better software and deciding between themselves what products will succeed in the marketplace. How can industry emulate this force of nature?

Now everyone is a filmmaker, broadcaster and storyteller. The quaint but already outdated methods of distributing ‘stories’ that relied on reaching ‘captive’ audiences by broadcasting ‘at’ them in one direction, we can liken to someone watering a tamed forest with a spray hose. That walled forest was once refreshing but they have quickly learned that outside this wall they have the ability to ‘grow their own’ they will, with or without us – and their combined wisdom dwarfs any sized company or government organization.

Playful Content R&D. Innovation is not about delivering linear tv and film over the wired network to a pc or onto a mobile phone. That is the utility business not the creative one.
The participatory audience are showing the way in how they create hybrid forms from film, tv, games and web applications. They often do this through behaviour rather than engineering. They mesh the way they consume media. Sending facebook updates from their mobile phone while half watching a TV programme but talking about it on twitter while listening to a friends music playlist and so on. New generations learn that they can cherry pick key parts of services making the new form better than the source as this diagram illustrates, it is not about the content, display or distribution but about the format they enable. The way the community are creating this content is a model for industry and the content and telco industries need to move beyond old business models and look at cross-media form rather than distribution

We have to think beyond mono-media. By that I mean see media as just a single film or TV episode or a mobile game. In fragmented markets where participant audiences spend time across hundreds of touch points we need to provide our stories for them across those devices and channels.

Peter Jackson said “I think we’re on a threshold of a new way to tell stories… It’s a form of entertainment that’s not a game and it’s not a film. It’s a filmic game experience.”

As an example quite a few companies and academic organisations in Australia are now developing compelling hybrid forms, such as TV and Games. This cross-reality mix is showing real potential as the live dynamic element of TV utlises the immersive quest like elements of online games. We must also be careful of assuming all interactivity is equal. There is a big difference between on one-hand, point-and-click ‘broadcast-interactivity’ or games where there are preset outcomes (watch a video or hear a sound) and on the other hand, spaces and places where the community can promote, comment or co-create with the original creators.

Moving on a little, I would like to quote from Building a Creative Innovation Economy, A Cultural Ministers Council report from February of this year.

“The creative sector must engage with the community to ensure ongoing support and survival in a global environment where there is increasing competition for consumers’ disposable time and dollars from an ever-expanding choice of leisure services and products. In this sense, user created content on social media web services such as YouTube and MySpace can be seen as competition for cultural audiences’ attention.…The Australian Film, Television and Radio School’s Laboratory of Advanced Media Production (LAMP) is another example of an innovative approach to training. The program enables the conception and development of multimedia content and services in a live-in setting, facilitating collaboration between project teams and mentors. The four stage process equips participants with the tools they need to create compelling interactive content that meets the needs of their audiences and marketplaces. LAMP offers participants a healthy mix of creativity, business awareness, technical skills and audience awareness.”

So I am keen to talk about one of many innovative initiatives in Australia to aid the development of new form content. LAMP (The Laboratory for Advanced Media Production) was formed in 2005 through AFTRS and comes from a tradition of hothouse development initiatives in the UK, at the BBC and the American Film Institute’s Digital Content lab. My experience is that Australia has some of the most creative thinkers in new emerging media content and they are very keen to work on creative vs just technological collaborations.

Since its inception LAMP has propelled over 61 projects and transformed hundreds of participants at workshops and seminars. The reason the hothouse, live-in-labs work is that they create small social networks with a complimentary mix of great story tellers, innovative technicians, interactive designers and producers. They also take these time poor people away from the normal day to day activities and allow them to take risks. This is exactly what the community is doing and who naturally take risks. The more we allow international teams to come together and take risks, the better for all and innovation will result.

Here is a short sample of some social media projects that have been developed at LAMP. Four example projects and two from the last collaborative Australia/New Zealand lab. Portable ghosts explores games that cross from web to real world to mobile. Master Raindrop looks at the combination of online games, mobile and real life movement training. Thursday’s Fictions explores spirituality and literature in a social virtual world and Wild Ark tells stories using mobile devices around zoos and other immersive real life environments.

Our second was developing seven ABC TV original and existing IP of which many ideas are now being implemented in that organisation.

Many projects developed around the world now create content that the community can take up, give them the tools or the forums to continue the stories so they can build and grow the original idea. Most LAMP projects now take this onboard and see the interaction with the audience as a primary driver behind their original idea. A good example of this is Bush IPTV – a pilot LAMP is producing for a broadband TV service in remote indigenous communities in far north Queensland.

Many projects also fall into the ‘simulation’ camp, creating virtual spaces that allow scenarios for entertainment, research and social collaboration. Here is a small selection of testimonials from recent participants.

I can highly recommend LAMP to anyone with a great idea looking to turn it into a success.
It was a totally immersive and focused, overwhelming experience – nothing like I’ve experienced before
The impossible is possible
It was a wonderful creative experience where I believe we were able to generate a wealth of truly new ideas. Marvellous!
A creative vibrant practical atmosphere
The lab exceeded my expectations…The way everyone helped each other out in an environment that was friendly, affectionate and creative allowed us to take our project in ways never thought of before.
This has definitely been one of the best experiences of my life. Thankyou!
I loved loved loved it!
Concept of LAMP is wonderful and it was above and beyond expectation
LAMP helped solidify confidence in the concept and creating a truly viable cross media platform
LAMP 08 was the most amazing professional development experience of my life!

The role of media producers now is to create compelling cross-media immersive entertainment experiences for global audiences. The producer as aggregator of content/curator – creating the conditions to activate audiences.

Games I would suggest are the most social media. A recent report from Bond University said that in Australia social and casual games are now the most dominant with only 19% of all gamers preferring to play alone with more than 56% preferring to play with others.

That suggests why the merging of traditional online social networks such as myspace and facebook with game worlds are growing so quickly. I personally have been involved in the creation of some of these spaces inside virtual worlds with Telstra’s and ABC TVs presence in Second Life (a great portent of future socio/economic virtual worlds) with BigPond now the highest globally for all brands in second life.

There are great opportunities for collaboration and the creation of a new form of global Social Virtual World like Korea’s Cyworld potentially stretching into English speaking countries – and to reiterate the social aspect again, 84% of Australians think that playing together is important for forming family connections with more than half saying games are more social forms of entertainment than other media.

To jump back to the notion of the hybrid form again. Much of this is reflecting my definition of web 3.0, the live or synchronous web where we communicate and co-create in real time. Social interaction through virtual worlds, interactive broadband TV or web and mobile applications can coexist and mingle in this world.

Australia for instance already have a range of companies that are pushing the envelope of what new form entertainment is. Hoodlum for example have just won BAFTA awards for their extended entertainment titles alongside Lost and BBC Spooks and like many LAMP projects they are creating ‘social entertainment’ which is about connecting communities with common goals and quests and stimulating the wisdom of the engaged crowd.

In 2007 Australia had around 40 traditional game companies who have produced more than 200 games resulting in $100mill in exports – notables include Ty The Tasmanian Tiger and De Blob but we still see the growth and dominance of MMOGs many originating in Asian countries and proliferating in Australia

AFTRS is pioneering new forms too. Alongside it’s world renowned TV and Film courses, AFTRS is developing a range of foundational and specialised graduate courses that will explore games, virtual environments and innovative new forms. They will explore the link between story and participatory applications and how interactive media can be made more ‘cinematic’ and immersive. At post graduate level it is planning to offer a project based course that encourages pioneering projects and inspires innovation.”

Australia, New Zealand and Korea are a wonderful mix of original thinking, great test-bed participant audiences and world leading technology. Able to leapfrog over legacy telecommunications we see in other parts of the world it is possible for ground breaking new formats to be developed in partnerships between the three countries. Australia and New Zealand particularly bring world leading innovative media forms to the mix.

Finally social networks have come about to both connect family and friends but also out of business and a collaborative need – we as content producers must be very focused on this to be relevant to the audience that are doing it themselves. Governments and creative industries can become allies in this equation and become authentic co-creators of social media spaces where the voice and creativity of the ‘audience’ can play out.

Nations who have key creative synergies, technical innovation and highly motivated participant audiences to collaborate and develop new forms together. Which is why I suggest we endeavour to create an initial rapid content R&D lab between the three countries be set up this year. The outcome of these will be many real projects a selection of which can be developed to market.

Kamsahamnida
Thank you

© Gary Hayes 2008

Jun 072008
 

John Banks and Peter Giles interview Matt Costello in two parts at the LAMP: Story of the Future Residential held at Couran Cove, Queensland, Australia in December 2007.

The Game of Writing Games with Matt Costello from AFTRSTalks on Vimeo.

Matt talks about story worlds and how the game play is very dependent on the underlying story and how more importantly they really need to be developed in parallel. He uses Bioshock and the first Halo as examples of how story is really starting to permeate games in a more integrated way. Matt also refers to two games he recently wrote, Rage and Pirates of Caribbean as how the iterative and creative process work from first hand experience, but points out that each game development and production is often different from the last.

“There is a heightened awareness that the story is important. Not that the narrative has to be linear or has to drive the gameplay, its just that the way the next generation machines look, the graphics and the new engines that are being developed, it has to be treated as a very serious thing…do I find that a lot of people create that bubble of time to sort of play with those ideas? Sometimes yes and sometimes no but often it can show in a project. But if there is one suggestion I would make to the industry in general is make that time, do the retreat, go for a week in the mountains, and come back and have in paper form the world and the story and the gameplay you want to have.”

Matt Costello 01The discussion moves to adaptations of games using existing properties like Aladdin, the aesthetics of games and in part two the cross-over form between film and game and the skills required by future creatives. Matt thinks that screenwriters are not being given the opportunities at film schools to immerse themselves in interactive media and visa-versa interactive students do not learn the deep storytelling skills. This doesn’t create the opportunity to create a new kind of person – a talented script writer who understands non-linear and interactive. Matt uses the examples of early animation when writing stories for cartoons seemed quite odd at the time of early Disney and then about games leading the film writing and Matt’s work informing the story for the next Pirates of the Caribbean film. The interview finishes with a discussion about the lack of courses looking specifically at growing story worlds and writing for games.

MP3 recording time 24:38 (10MB) Click to listen
MP4 recording time 24:38 (126.5MB) Click to download

ABOUT LAMP PODCASTS

All LAMP podcasts are published through iTunes – click on the icon below if you have iTunes to subscribe now!

This podcast presentation produced and presented by LAMP @ AFTRS.

Filmed by Fadia Abboud, Sound by Peter Giles and Fadia Abboud
Podcast description, editing, processing and publishing by Gary Hayes

MATT COSTELLO – Writer and Games Designer, Polar Productions
Matt CostelloMatt Costello is based in New York, London and LA and has written ground-breaking and award-winning novels, games, and television. Matt has scripted dozens of best-selling games and of one Time Magazine said, “The story is delivered with unusual art.” He wrote the groundbreaking Pirates of the Caribbean 3 game across all platforms and has been commissioned to do the fourth in the series.

Since writing the critically acclaimed classic game The 7th Guest, he has scripted dozens of best-selling games such as Shellshock-Nam ‘67 (Guerrilla Games and Eidos), Bad Boys 2 (Empire) and 2005’s Doom 3 winner of an unprecedented five awards at E3 including the Game Critics Award: Best of E3. Just Cause, co-written for Eidos, debuted as the #1 game for Xbox 360 in the UK. Named ‘Best Adventure Game’ at the 2006 E3, it premiered on the US best-seller lists as the #2 Xbox 360 game.

He has written a major new game for Eidos and Rage a new game for ID Software and other notable games include:

  • Hercules, for Disney Interactive
  • The Dark Half, for MGM.
  • Derelict, for The Sci-Fi Channel
  • Fatal Illusion -The Clue Chronicles – for Hasbro
  • Barbie’s Riding Adventure–for Mattel
  • Clifford’s Reading– for Scholastic
  • Starsky & Hutch – for Empire
  • The Italian Job – Eidos

Matt also specialises in the kid’s genre and has created many award-winning games for children. Several years ago he co-created one of the first major experiments in ‘two-way TV’, called ZoogDisney. Branded as ‘TV you do’ – for two years the ZoogDisney weekend bloc re-shaped the Disney channel, bringing it squarely into the interactive and ‘tweens world. He has written a kids book series for Scholastic , The Kids of Einstein Elementary, which blends adventure and math and also scripted episodes of the award-winning PBS animated series, Cyberchase. Other awards include the landmark Aladdin’s Mathquest with math expert Marilyn Burns for Disney, as well as A Cartoon History of the Universe (Putnam).

Matt is a designer of many role-playing and board games, including Dungeons and Dragons, Call of Cthulhu, Batman, Lone Wolf & Cub, and many others. He also co-wrote episodes of the BBC/Disney series Microsoap, winner of the Prix de Jeunesse and is currently creating an MMOG using Multiverse which integrates its story world with an animated Childrens BBC TV series. Penguin published his latest novel, Nowhere, in 2007.

Jun 062008
 

Don’t have a black Friday-register now. Places filling fast!

AFTRS LAMP presents two cutting edge seminars:

Generating Online Buzz for Creative Projects
Thursday June 19. Learn how to attract online attention and engage participatory audiences and global consumers.

Building Social Networks and Growing Communities
Friday June 20. Follows on from Generating Online Buzz for Creative Projects, and focuses on building and managing online social networks and communities.

Generating Online Buzz for Creative Projects

Led by Laurel Papworth these two seminars cut through the jargon and find the true potential of Web 2.0, ‘The Sharing Web’.
Learn how to attract attention and engage participatory audiences and global consumers. A must attend workshop for writers, designers, filmmakers, producers, gamers and marketers or anyone who wants to build and maintain a presence online.

  • Discover techniques to find and build online audiences
  • Utilise blogs, wikis, RSS feeds, twitter and social media portals and networks to connect with global communities of interest
  • Learn strategies that encourage people to virally recommend and distribute your content
  • Understand how to make your content findable on the internet

Laurel Papworth is a senior consultant in social networks. She helped digitize Fairfax in the early 1990’s and established Convergent Media at Optus in the late 1990s. Laurel is a dynamic speaker and workshop trainer, regular radio and TV guest, and is in demand by companies globally to help leverage their media and public relations activities with social networking tools and strategies. Laurel teaches social media at the University of Sydney and lectures as part of a Masters of Convergent Media at the University of Western Sydney. Laurel consults to government, business and not-for-profits around the world. She recently returned from teaching blogging and social media to Arabic women in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Other speakers include:

  • Bruce Moyle – Joffre Street Productions
  • Andrew Apostola – Portable Content
  • Peter Giles – AFTRS Director of Digital Media Division
  • Catherine Gleeson – AFTRS Interactive Media Lecturer

Date: Thursday 19 Jun 2008

  • Duration: 1 day. 9.30-5pm, lunch included
  • Course Fee: $120
  • Venue: The Australian Film Television and Radio School
  • The Entertainment Quarter
  • 130 Bent St
  • Moore Park NSW, 2021
  • Application deadline: June 13. Places filling fast-register here

Building Social Networks and Growing Communities

This seminar follows on from the Generating Online Buzz for Creative Projects seminar and focuses on how organisations can utilise online social networks to meet business objectives. It is ideal for those with a general grasp of blogs, wikis, and tagging – even if you are currently a forum or community leader, you may not have thought of all the insights this course presents on running an online community.

  • Learn how to prepare for massive membership signups
  • Use the best techniques to gain, retain and manage members in your social network
  • Create a safe space for brand leaders and evangelists to grow your network
  • Build trust and develop blueprints for a self-sustaining network

Speakers include:

  • Ngaire Stevens – Habbo Hotel
  • Laurel Papworth – Social Network Strategist.
  • Peter Giles – AFTRS Director of Digital Media Division
  • Catherine Gleeson – AFTRS Interactive Media Lecturer

Date: Friday 20 Jun 2008

  • Duration: 1 Day 9.30 -5.00 pm, lunch included
  • Course Fee: $120. By attending both seminars you pay just $200 – a saving of $40
  • Venue: The Australian Film Television and Radio School
  • The Entertainment Quarter
  • 130 Bent St
  • Moore Park NSW, 2021
  • Application deadline: June 13. Places filling fast-register here
Apr 152008
 

‘Inviting Participants to Your Party and Keeping Them There’ will demystify Web 2.0 and help you harness its power to promote your creative project online.

This LAMP Insight Seminar series in Hobart, Sydney and Melbourne examines techniques to attract online audiences and keep them coming back for more. It also explores how to effectively promote a project online, initiate conversations with online audiences and build and manage communities.

Designed to get participants thinking on their feet and engaging with the latest techniques of building online audiences and managing growth – participants will find out how to keep a crowd.

Key topics explored during the seminars include:

  • What techniques can be used to build an online audience
  • How to prepare for massive membership signups
  • How to make sure content is ‘findable’ on the internet
  • What the best techniques are to gain, retain and manage members in a social network
  • How to build trust and plan for a self sustaining network

The LAMP Insight 2008 Seminar Series 1 includes:

Creating Online Buzz and Growing Communities Hobart – 10-May-2008

A must for writers, designers, filmmakers, producers, gamers and marketers, or anyone, who wants to build and maintain an online presence. This one day seminar with a workshop component will empower participants to:

  • Identify the strengths and weaknesses of existing social networks
  • Explore the emerging opportunities of online media to enrich creative projects
  • Evaluate tools and techniques for building online communities
  • Stay up to date with the latest cutting edge work in web 2.0, mobile media, advanced TV, games and virtual worlds.

Course Details

Growing Worlds: Turning Stories Into Games Hobart – 28-May-2008

Find out how to adapt your story for the world of games. Come and hear award-winning novelist, TV and games writer Matt Costello talk about the key ingredients for planning, writing, designing and structuring a compelling game. Course Details

Generating Online Buzz for Creative Projects Sydney – 19-Jun-2008

Cut through the jargon and find out the true potential of Web 2.0 to initiate conversations with global audiences. Areas include:

  • Techniques to use to build an online audience
  • Using blogs, wikis and social networks to connect with global communities of interest
  • The best techniques to encourage people to virally distribute your content

Course Details

Building Social Networks and Growing Communities Sydney – 20-Jun-2008

A one day seminar with a workshop component designed to get you thinking on your feet and engaging with the latest techniques to build and manage fast growing social networks.

This course is focussed on how business needs can be met by supporting an online social network and is ideal for those with a reasonable grasp of user applications such as blogs, wikis, and tagging – even if you are currently a forum or community leader, you may not have thought of all the insights this course presents on running a community. Course Details

Generating Online Buzz for Creative Projects Melbourne – 4-Jul-2008

Cut through the jargon and find out the true potential of Web 2.0 to initiate conversations with global audiences. Course Details

Building Social Networks and Growing Communities Melbourne – 5-Jul-2008

Find out how to community maintain user engagement and ensure your online audience comes back for more. Course Details

Speakers in the series include:

  • Laurel Papworth – Social Network Strategist
  • Bruce Moyle – Joffre Street Productions
  • Gary Hayes – AFTRS Director of LAMP
  • Andrew Apostola – Portable Content
  • Catherine Gleeson – AFTRS Interactive Media Lecturer
  • Peter Giles – AFTRS Director of Digital Media Division

How to apply:

  • Click here or call 03 6223 5983 during business hours for more information.
  • Be quick places are limited.

Venue and fee for Tasmania only:
Course Location: Hobart Function Centre, Elizabeth St Pier, Hobart, TAS
Start Date: 10-May-2008
Finish Date: 10-May-2008
Duration: 1 day 9.30-5.00pm
Course Fee: $120
Applications Deadline: 25-Apr-2008

Dec 082007
 

THE VIRTUAL STORY
Six half hour podcasts featuring SLCN.tv, Physical TV, Jackie Turnure, Gary Hayes and many more from the Film Making and Cinematic Experiences Using Virtual Worlds and Games seminar in Sept 2007 recorded live at the Museum of Sydney.

All podcast presentations produced and presented by LAMP @ AFTRS.
Audio edited & processed by Gary Hayes. Podcast descriptions by Casandra Joslyn.

All LAMP podcasts are published through iTunes – click on the icon below if you have iTunes to subscribe now!

note: all speaker bios below…

1 SECOND LIFE CABLE NETWORK – Gary Wisniewski

Gary discusses the technical and logistical aspects of making television in 2nd life. He briefly takes us through the background of the 2nd life cable network, the largest and most successful 2nd life television station, 100% of the programming of which is live from 2nd life and broadcast to the web.Gary talks about the advantages and disadvantages of doing things live in-world, takes us through some of the processes and shows us some of the programs themselves.

MP3 recording time 33:37 (11.7MB) Click to listen

2 THURSDAY’S FICTIONS – Karen Pearlman and Richard James Allen

Karen Pearlman and Richard James Allen take you through the transition of their project, Thursday’s Fictions from the stage, to the page, to the screen and now to 2nd life. They discuss what’s exciting about the process of working in virtual worlds, the interweaving of the form and content, the collaborative process involved and what surprised them about working in 2nd life.They also cover the key shifts they encountered taking Thursday’s Fictions into the film media from the stage show and book, look at the shift from closed forms where the content is delivered to the audience, to a more open form where the audience get to participate, and talk about discovering how working in 2nd life could offer opportunities to explore other themes in a story that has been told across various media platforms.

MP3 recording time 30:42 (10.6MB) Click to listen

3 THE STORY ENVIRONMENT – Gary Hayes

Gary talks about virtual spaces and the collaborative nature of creating stories within them. He focuses on worlds that are social i.e. real people collaborating in real time creating experiences, and also looks at mixed reality – people in real space and in the virtual space.Gary shows a continuum both between the customisation of the worlds from very fixed to very open and between the individual and the collaborative, and looks at where some of these virtual spaces fall within them.

We look at story creation in these environments, the different kinds of environment available, and how these environments can affect the kinds of story you tell. We also hear about the tools of the trade and the four key ingredients to creating anything of value in such a space including character animation and camera manipulation.

MP3 recording time 33:37 (11.3MB) Click to listen

4 CREATING PLACES – Kit Devine

Kit Devine, a lecturer in 3D at AFTRS talks us through her phd project, a virtual version of Sydney’s Rocks area from 1788 to present, as an illustration of the difference between building places as opposed to spaces.She covers how social interaction is a big part of creating a sense of place, as it is the human meaning associated with a location that makes it a place.

Kit also looks at the quality of real-time playback that is now available from 3D programs and shows how this can be valuable to filmmakers in the use of 3D environments for pre-visualisation.

MP3 recording time 16:23 (5.6MB) Click to listen

5 THE VIRTUAL FILM – Jackie Turnure

The art of Machinima – an evolution. Jackie takes us back 11 years to the beginnings of Machinima, (combination of Machine and Cinema) to look at how far things have come and where they might be heading. We move through the evolution of Machinima from simple game records through the popularity of stand alone short films to the rise of the episodic and the shift from comedies to more thoughtful drama.Jackie illustrates the importance of good writing, dialogue and voice acting in machinima and also looks at what makes people choose to create their story using this process.

She touches on the issue of copyright and how to make money from machinima and looks at new tools for creating Machinima license free. Jackie concludes her presentation with her projection for machinima over the next ten years.

MP3 recording time 36:42 (12.6MB) Click to listen

6 GAME MEET FILM: PRODUCTION, SKILLS AND FUTURES – Panel

“The Craft of Story Environment and Games” – A panel of experts moderated by Gary Hayes look at the production issues and future implications of combining the skills of filmmaking with games design with emphasis on machinima and virtual worlds.

A discussion about traditional film making crafts and virtual worlds. Moderated by Gary Hayes with panelists: Peter Giles (Head of Digital Media), Mark Ward (Head of Sound), Jon Rohde (Head of Design) and Gary Wisniewski (CEO, SLCN.tv). Significant comments from Karen Pearlman and Teresa Rizzo.

MP3 recording time 31:10 (10.7MB) Click to listen

THE VIRTUAL STORY
Film Making and Cinematic Experiences Using Virtual Worlds and Games

There is a revolution happening in the way both users and professionals are creating films and story environments. YouTube, Machinima.com and many other video portals are filled with thousands of short films made in game engines and virtual worlds. It is a fast changing space and even in the past week HBO have commissioned the world’s first machinima series to made entirely in a games environment and the first episode is a nominee for an academy award. This two part course consists of a seminar which introduces participants to the exciting work being produced in this area, and a one day workshop that provides a hands-on introduction to the tools that are available.

Virtual Story

SEMINAR

The one day seminar, presented by award winning machinima and virtual world creators, will start with state of the art examples, live demos, a panel review show and presentations on the art and craft of machinimation. The second half of the day will look closely at Story Environments – places where rich virtual experiences encourage users to “live”, role play and create their own stories. Several case studies will illustrate the tools and design techniques being used to create these rich story spaces. The day will end with a panel where traditional film industry practitioners discuss how their various crafts apply to films being made in these virtual worlds, followed by another live, theatrical machinima.

Presenters include (see Bios below):
* Gary Hayes, AFTRS – Director, LAMP and Head of Virtual Worlds The Project Factory
* Jackie Turnure, AFTRS – Lecturer, Interactive Storytelling, and co-creator of machinima feature Stolen Life
* Gary Wisniewski – CEO of Second Life Cable Network SLCN.TV
* Ian Brown, AFTRS – Lecturer, VFX and Animation
* Richard James Allen – Writer & Director
* Karen Pearlman, AFTRS – Curriculum Designer, and Writer, Producer, Editor

Special Guest Presenter:

Gary Wisniewski is the CEO of the Second Life Cable Network (SLCN.TV), a professional video network designed to expand the in-world audience as well as deliver virtual entertainment to the real-world. SLCN.TV was started in March 2007 and has now established itself as the leading broadcast service in Second Life. Live broadcasts include The Transformers’ press conference, the largest in-world event ever staged, as well as in-world events for the Die Hard 4release, the 300 press event featuring Frank Miller, as well as events for the ABC and many more. Gary will be demonstrating some remarkable techniques and camera technology they use in the some of their four camera live machinima captures in the seminar and the workshop the following day.

Guest Panelists include:

* Mark Ward, AFTRS – Head of Sound
* John Rohde, AFTRS – Head of Design
* Teresa Rizzo, AFTRS – Lecturer, Screen Studies
* Timothy Smith, AFTRS – Screen and games writer
* Melvin Montalban, AFTRS – Directing student

SPEAKER DETAILS Jackie Turnure
Jackie was the script editor and voice director on Stolen Life, an animated feature produced in Machinima, written and produced by Peter Rasmussen. Jackie is a lecturer in interactivity and cross media at AFTRS, where she is also a mentor for LAMP (Laboratory of Advanced Media Production). She brings a unique perspective to the role of narrative in cross media production. Recently she won a development award at Milia 2007 from Ogilvy and AMEX for her Alternate Reality Game project ‘Diamond Reef’.

For the last 15 years she has worked across film, television, games and online production, with a particular focus on animation and children’s content. She has written and produced numerous 3D animated kids’ games for PC, including Bananas in Pyjamas – It’s Party Time, Oz – The Magical Adventure and Oz – The Interactive Storybook. The games have won awards and been distributed in 18 countries. Jackie recently completed story producing and writing three episodes on Deadly, a half hour animated TV series based on the books by Paul Jennings and Morris Gleitzman.

Gary Wisniewski
Gary Wisniewski is the CEO of the Second Life Cable Network (SLCN.TV), a professional video network designed to expand the in-world audience as well as deliver virtual entertainment to the real-world. SLCN.TV was started in March 2007 and has now established itself as the leading broadcast service in Second Life. Live broadcasts include The Transformers press conference, the largest in-world event ever staged, as well as in-world events for the Die Hard release, the 300 press event featuring Frank Miller, as well as events for the ABC and many more. Gary will be demonstrating some remarkable techniques and camera technology they use in the some of their four camera live machinima captures in the seminar and the workshop the following day.

Gary Hayes
Gary is the Director of LAMP and the Head of Virtual Worlds at The Project Factory. He has led The Laboratory for Advanced Media Production at AFTRS since 2005 who have developed 54 Australian emerging media projects and run hundreds of workshops and seminars. As Head of Virtual Worlds at the Project Factory he has personally produced and built Second Life presences for Australian brands, including Telstra, ABC TV, Tourism Victoria, Physical TV and many more. Before coming to Australia Gary was Senior Producer at BBC New Media for 8 years devising and producing many of the BBC’s digital ‘firsts’ – the first 24/7 Interactive TV service, the first live internet documentary and the first truly interactive programming for Broadband TV. He also created over 20 other enhanced TV shows, several future BBC cross-platform navigators and was part of BBC Imagineering developing early ‘inhabited TV’, Virtual World and TV Mixed Reality formats.

As BBC Senior Development Manager he worked on global BBC digital strategies and externally chaired the Business Models for TV-Anytime (the global personalized TV standard) and then moved to the US to develop on-demand TV with broadcasters such as NBC, Showtime and CBS. He recently co-authored a UK Department Trade and Industry Report on Personalised TV and has been an International Interactive Emmy juror for the past two years. Gary recently keynoted on virtual worlds at CeBit, AIMIA and presented on education and brands in virtual worlds on radio, podcasts and many seminars. He produces dramatic and corporate machinima and runs workshops for cinematographers, designers, and script writers exploring the potential of shared, social online virtual worlds for collaborative production, creativity and education and runs a popular blog on media personalisation, digital brands, new media forms and creativity at www.personalizemedia.com.

Dr Richard James Allen Dr Karen Pearlman
Dr Richard James Allen (writer, choreographer, director) and Dr Karen Pearlman (editor, choreographer, producer) are founders of The Physical TV Company and explorers of media and the mind. In New York as That Was Fast they brought content back into dance in The Laughing Movie, Alphabet x 2, The Charlie Stories and other works in their original ‘cinematic blend of text and dance action’. In Australia with companies such as
Dance North and Tasdance, they explored the nexus between fully fledged original play scripts and dance scripts to make ‘dance plays’ such as If War Were A Dance and Blue Cities, bringing movement into character development and choreography into story.

They have been world leaders in the exploration of video dance and dance film and their work in this area as The Physical TV Company has taken them to a deep integration of the languages of cinema, literature and choreography as witnessed by short films such as Rubberman Accepts The Nobel Prize, No Surrender, and Down Time Jaz, and the short feature Thursday’s Fictions. Always engaged by new spaces in which meaning can be explored and communicated, they have recently delved into mobile content with the adaptation of Richard’s 9th book, The Kamikaze Mind, into animated phone poems, and the adaptation of the Richard’s 8th book, Thursday’s Fictions, from a play to a film to a 3D online immersive world in Second Life.

Ian Brown
Ian has been writing and playing games since the days of the Commodore 64, and is the proud owner of a scratch-built cocktail MAME machine. He is currently interested in the impending cross-over of film drama and games technology. For the past ten years Ian has worked in many disciplines and capacities in the film and television industry, encompassing 3D artist and supervisor, art direction, matte painting, production design and storyboarding.

His feature credits include The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, Moulin Rouge, The Quiet American, Hero, Mission Impossible 2, The Man who Sued God, The Great Raid, Red Planet, Garage Days and The Thin Red Line. His TVC work includes over 50 high-profile international commercials. As a director his work spans both shorts and high-end music videos, earning both local and international awards and nominations, including an AFI.

Panellists

Mark Ward

Whilst studying creative writing and literature Mark became infected with the filmmaking virus and has never fully recovered. A graduate of AFTRS in 1985 (Directing and Sound), he founded a sound design company, Counterpoint Sound, in 1987 with fellow graduates of the School. Counterpoint was a “script-to-screen” service for sound, and built its reputation in documentaries, short and experimental drama and TVCs. In 1991 the same team formed Oracle Pictures, a production company aimed at developing and producing documentary and drama.

By the end of 2000 Mark had put Counterpoint into a box and shifted focus to feature films, working on such features as Lantana, The Quiet American, and In The Cut amongst others. Mark has been a member of both the Australian Screen Sound Guild and ASDA since 1995. Since entering the industry over 20 years ago, Mark has experienced the transition of screen-sound from sprockets to analogue multi-track to software-based design and production. With the same feverish curiosity he looks forward to the creative opportunities of interactive sound design.

Jon Rohde
Jon Rohde has worked in the TV and film industry for over two decades working his way up through most Art Department positions. His most recent position was Production Designer on R.A.N. working in the Torres Strait for Chapman Pictures. Rohde’s other credits include:

  • Police Rescue – Assistant Designer, Blue Murder – Assistant Art Director, Wildside – Art Director
  • Art Director on Australian features including Risk and Bootmen (AFI winner for Production Design)
  • Segment manager for Sydney 2000 Olympics Closing Ceremonies
  • Production Designer for Columbia Tri-Star films; After the Rain and Heroes Mountain
  • Production Designer for Southern Star; Young Lions, Fireflies
  • Production Designer for Screentime; Jessica.

Jon completed a Diploma of Arts in Film and TV at QCA in Brisbane and worked for the Seven Network. He then moved to Sydney and began work in Art Departments for ABC Drama while completing a Bachelor of Arts in Visual Arts at UTS. He has worked for numerous production companies and with a wide range of producers, directors and other designers.

Teresa Rizzo

Teresa Rizzo graduated from Murdoch University, Western Australia, with a BA Honours in Communication Studies in 1994. Her honours thesis-video On Becoming won numerous awards nationally, and internationally. From 1994-2005 she has worked in the pay television industry in various producer roles, in organisations such as Teleitalia, Galaxy Media and the Premium Movie Partnership. She recently submitted her doctoral thesis in Film Studies at the University of New South Wales. Teresa’s research interests include Deleuze and feminist film theory, the modern horror genre, and the pay TV industry in Australia. Publications:

  • “The Molecular Poetics of Before Night Falls,” Rhizomes, forthcoming Sep. 2005.
  • “The Alien Series: A Deleuzian Perspective,” Women: a Cultural Review, Volume 15, Number 3 / November 2004.
  • “On Becoming-An Interview with Moira Gatens,” Southern Review vol. 28.1(1995): pp. 53-68. Questions and Interview by Teresa Rizzo.
  • On Becoming. Experimental documentary. Dir. prod. and writ. Teresa Rizzo 27mins. Winner of Flickerfest 1994.