Jun 042008
 

Gary Hayes will be speaking and representing LAMP, AFTRS and new Australian Content at The 2008 KANZ Australia Korea New Zealand Broadband Summit on 19-20 June 2008 in Seoul, Korea

The nine or so Australian speakers at the two day summit will be led by Senator the Hon Stephen Conroy, Minister for Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy and will be hosted by the Korean Minister, Mr See-Joong Choi, Chairman, Korean Communications Commission (KCC).

The summit will cover topics such as Broadband Technologies, Intelligent Broadcasting, Services and Applications, R&D and Safety and Security. Gary will be talking about the growing importance of participatory content, the collision of traditional media and new collaborative tools from a story perspective and how these hybrids are an analog for the way nations could be working together – ‘the international, digital mash-up’. He will also talk about how nations can develop strategies to share learning from R&D and new industry forms.

The KANZ Broadband Summit is an annual meeting of Australian, New Zealand and Korean organisations to discuss the latest developments in broadband infrastructure, applications and content. This year it is hosted by the Korean Communications Commission, providing a focal point for discussions on mutual international collaboration in commercial and research opportunities in broadband content, services and infrastructure.

The past three Summits have attracted around 100 organisations with the objective of fostering collaboration and exploring new business opportunities. With the passing of each Summit we are seeing stronger, closer business ties established between the participating countries.

There is also an opportunity for companies for all regions to attend and what follows is some information for late applications:

You will be joining an Australian delegation made up of representatives from commercial and research organisations involved in the creation and delivery of new content and services for broadband networks. Participants will take part in the Summit by attending the formal sessions and making contact with their counterpart organisations. The broad details and arrangements for the Summit are set out below.

This is a great opportunity to participate in a top level ministerial forum, to take advantage of that forum to liaise with counterparts from Korea and New Zealand at the cutting edge of broadband services and to establish new collaborative ventures.

I urge you to register your interest in attending with our Coordinator, Ruth Conry at ruth.conry@mnetcorporation.com by Friday 30th May. Ruth can provide all the information you need regarding arrangements in Korea – her mobile number is 0401 719 975.

Companies who have already confirmed their attendance from Australia to provide key speakers at the Summit include:

  • National ICT Australia (NICTA)
  • Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC)
  • m.Net Corporation
  • CSIRO
  • Australian Film TV & Radio School (AFTRS): LAMP
  • Internet Society of Australia (ISOC-AU)
  • Microsoft Australia
  • Australian Federal Police (AFP)

In addition you will have the opportunity to meet with New Zealand and Korean counterparts including senior representatives from:

  • Samsung Electronics
  • Electronics & Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Korea
  • Korea Telecom (KT)
  • TU Media Corp
  • Mobile Convergence Co
  • Asia Pacific Satellite Industries
  • Korea Information Security Agency
  • Telecom NZ
  • Zodal
  • University of Auckland
  • MediaLab
  • HectorWorld
  • Kordia

The Week in Seoul
Australia will be represented at a senior level at the OECD Ministerial Meeting on “The Future of the Internet Economy” in Seoul from 17-18 June. After the OECD meeting, ministers will open the 4th Korea Australia and New Zealand Broadband Summit taking place from 19-20 June.

Also in Seoul that week, the World IT Show provides opportunities to discover both local and international technologies being promoted in the Korean market.

In Conclusion
The Korea Australia New Zealand Broadband Summit represents an opportunity to participate in a top level ministerial forum and to take advantage of that forum to make contact with Korean organisations which, in a number of cases, are at the cutting edge of broadband technology.

With so much happening in Seoul that week, this is an unprecedented opportunity which will not occur again for some time.

AIMIA have also covered this here

Sep 122006
 

Presented by AFTRS LAMP. How are virtual worlds developing and what are the opportunities for media creatives?

Luke Carruthers is a games developer who runs a company called Imaginary Numbers in Sydney. The company creates online games and their first title Tactica Online is a fast-moving strategy RPG set amidst conspiracy and intrigue of Da Vinci’s world.  Luke Carruthers’ first company, Magna Data, was founded in 1993, and went on to become one of Australia’s most successful early Internet service providers. Sold in 1999 for A$16 million, it was noted for its innovative services, including operating one of the country’s first DSL broadband networks. Since then he has founded three more companies, all focused on the Internet and telecommunications market, including Inter-touch, an in-hotel network operator recently acquired by NTT DoCoMo for US$70 million, and Alterna Telecom, which provided wholesale PSTN switching services and was acquired by RSLCom in 2002. Secretary of the Internet Industry Association from 1995 to 2001, and joining the board of the Game Developers Association of Australia in 2005, he has also worked with numerous government and industry bodies aiding in the development of the legislative and regulatory framework for the telecommunications, media, and entertainment industries.

Summary of the presentation

Using World of Warcraft and Second Life as examples at both ends of the spectrum of social online games Luke talks about environment design, demographics and game-play competitive structures of these services. He differentiates between role playing competitive games and sand-box environments of virtual worlds and talks in great detail about the motivations of game players and the social drivers of MMORPGs. Luke also addresses issues of self-policing and trust based social networks that spring up naturally in these environments referring to the griefers who try to upset the narrative/gameplay of other and the groups of guardians that try to reduce this irritation. In contrast he talks about the virtual world of Second Life as a game with no rules, goals or driving narrative. The economics and the fact that upto 50% of inhabitants of ‘worlds’ tend to be more socially outgoing females as opposed to the 15-30% in ‘games’ are used as part of the differentiation discussion. Luke talks about the way players communicate in worlds and how games such as Final Fantasy XI one has english and japanese speakers thrown together and how emotes and symbols are used more in those cases.

Luke then talks at length about the film/game business and production cross overs and how now films like Avatar is being created as a film and online game simultaneously. With costs of $64 mill for WoW the budgets are similar to major features with around $60mill in profit each month. He says that games took 20 years to reach a $10bill industry in the US whereas film took 90 years to get to the same level. The skills required for games creation are similar to film fx and in the US film students have a lot more game ‘education’ than in Australia. Luke sayd that this money is made mostly throught the dominant model of subscription and pays for the designers, producers, artists and programmers that form the four divisions of most games publishers. An interesting aspect of MMORPG production is the cultural differences in that Final Fantasy for example, which is predominantly and Eastern game, has around 75% passive cinematics (or linear video) and 25% actual interactive gameplay. He talks about the potential cross over in skills between traditional film and game production citing cinematographers, writers, composers, set and production designers have a role to play, whereas editors are more focused on the cinematic creation. Luke suggests it is only in the past year or so that how a scene is presented to the player is important and that is promising for traditional film creators especially lighting design which is going through enormous growth at the moment.

Luke finishes this insightful presentation by talking about the future and how AI will take a more dominant role as the next generation of SIMs type games come to the fore and emotional expression, realistic body language and character/personality will mean it becomes harder and harder to tell the difference between human or machine controlled avatars. The final element of the talk is about the ethical, control and moral dimensions of game access as well as the things Luke sees will make the difference between games and film blur to the Nth degree.

AFTRS Sydney 5 Sept 2006 – Time 57:46. Click to listen

PODCAST SUBSCRIPTION
All LAMP podcasts are also published through the iTunes store.

This presentation was highly interactive with lots of questions and has been edited to provide reasonable continuity.

Audio edited and processed by Gary Hayes.

Aug 072006
 

Immersion: Designing Experience © Gary Hayes 2006.

The fourth of 8 podcasts recorded live during the LAMP lab on Milson Island, Sydney in July 2006 – in front of the eight teams and ten mentors developing emerging media projects.

gary hayes“think of the experience, not just the service, the differentiators between professionals, thats you, versus users is that you should be very adept at creating user experiences versus creating individual pieces of content. I don’t think users in the future will be creating rich interconnected narratives across platforms and time”

Gary gives an informal and demo rich (hence a few breaks) talk about how to design pervasive entertainment, user experiences. By briefly looking at the eight areas below, using it as a rough framework, he attempts to dissect the interactive experience. He uses a range of examples from interactive services he helped create or produce such as X-Creatures, Top of the Pops, The L Word and virtual environments in Second Life through to games such as Indigo Prophecy and cross-media services including Da Vinci Code. He refers to the importance of flow and making sure the scale of the experience doesn’t feel limited by allowing viewers to take part in the creation process itself.

1 SCALE:
…of the experience. The size of the screen and the amount of story world to explore has enormous impacts on immersion – as well as the detail of individual objects within the ‘world’.
Ask: How big is my story world?

2. ESCAPISM (play)
In terms of building ‘play’ – it should be as fun making it as doing it.Today the experience author has to create tools for play, rather than fixed media and fixed routes through it. Randomness can go someway there – but for true immersion through play, give people tools to create their own variants of your property.
Ask: Can users really play in my creation?

3. SENSES
…the amount of senses that are engaged by an experience gives it the most potential for immersion. Make sure as well as intellectual and emotional engagement you consider sounds and the aesthetics of visual grammar and simm (simultaneous media usage). On a social network level – be aware that humans are extremely aware of
machine vs human interaction.
Ask: Are the visuals and audio truly rich and compelling?

4. PERSPECTIVE
…does the story or narrative engage? This is obvious, if there is nothing for you to be drawn along by (even your own story in some cases) then you will switch off. Put your audience inside the protagonist’s head.
Ask: How can I get the user to ‘empathise’ and BE a story world character

5. SERENDIPITY
…how the world or show you are watching has elements of surprise. The more scripted and formulaic the less immersive. An unspoilt new film at the cinema can surprise, social networks are and should be as unpredictable as life, sadly ‘most’ TV and pop-music are at the other end of the scale.
Ask: Do I really have anything that will surprise?

6. TEMPORALITY

How real time does the experience feel? Are you swept along by real time events, that are part of a social network and also are your choices taking place when you want them to. Sometimes on-demand is far less compelling than real time, online game and social network.
Ask: How ‘live’ does the service feel?

7. PERSONALIZATION

How much can you minutely affect the world and yourself in it? How much will the world reflect you for being there? Most importantly, how much of your real world personality can you bring with you into the experience. It is all about making the world feel like you belong – and TOOLS, TOOLS, TOOLS
Ask: Is each user given an individual user journey, can they roll their own?

8. RESONANCE AND CHOICE

How much control or agency do you have over the experience? Are your actions permanent and seen by all? Can you really do and say what you want – freedom of choice. True resonance is like a virtuous circle, you do something and there is a response that forever changes the environment. Like real life.
Ask: Can my service change based on user input?

He also mentions that having embedded social networks inside you experience is as important as any content you may think of including in your user experience project –
“think of your service as a tool, think of it as a place to play”.

For more background on this presentation check out Gary’s blog Immersion: Ambient TV, Addictive MMORPG

and to download the 2.2MB PDF of the presentation click here

PODCAST SUBSCRIPTION
All LAMP podcasts are also published through the iTunes store.

GARY HAYES – Interaction Producer & Director LAMP@AFTRS

Gary Hayes has been at the forefront of worldwide emerging media development and production since 1993. After joining the BBC in London as an editor he quickly moved on to lead the BBC’s development of the internet, interactive TV and emerging platforms from 95-04 as Senior Producer and Development Manager. The BBC grew from a linear broadcaster to world leader in cross-platform services during this period.

Gary devised & produced many of the BBC’s ‘firsts’ – Digital Text, the first broadcast interactive TV service – ‘Nomad’ the first live internet documentary – ‘X-Creatures’ the first broadband TV service and in ‘96 introduced the first video and audio onto the BBC’s internet sites. He also produced and devised over 20 other eTV and broadband TV services including Top of the Pops, Travel Show, State Apart and several future BBC cross-platform navigators. Gary created numerous courses and seminars on Interactive thinking for linear producers, was active in the Imagineering and R&D depts and was a leading part of BBC strategy teams from 2001 in preparing for on-demand, cross-platform services. He also chaired the Business Models Group from 99-03 for TV-Anytime (the lead media-on-demand standards body).

Living & consulting in the US during 2004 he line produced Showtime’s PVR enhanced L-Word, as part of AFI digital labs and devised a range of new on-demand program formats for two national TV networks. Gary also produced & chaired conferences around LA including Hollywood industry panel seminars and Digital Days both looking at emerging media super-distribution models. He has presented at over fifty major international conferences and written several consultancy papers including US Interactive TV Advertising and more recently a report for the DTI on Personal Video Enablers for the UK media industry. He runs a blog on Media Personalisation, Digital Business and Creativity at www.personalizemedia.com

Gary is also currently exploring the potential of shared social online virtual spaces for collaborative production, creativity and education. A specialist in personalised digital TV over broadcast and broadband networks Gary evangelises on the empowerment potential of non-passive media. As a published music producer, composer and performer he has had over 200 works performed live and on TV and Radio.

Sydney 3 July 2006 – Time 27:26. Click to listen

May 232006
 

Web 2.0, TV 2.0 © David Jensen 2006
Recorded live and unedited during the LAMP lab in Perth in May 2006 in front of the seven teams developing emerging media projects.

David JensenDavid helps us understand what broadband TV really is and talks about the future of branded entertainment and how this now more important than networks or publishers. He continues with references to the new content over broadband networks, televisual design and raises questions – “what is the content? who owns it? how do we make it? how do we borrow from past media production that inform our practise in this new world? – Content that is 3 minutes long and two hours wide”.

David includes a demo and insight into his companies tool for rich media publishing across multiple platforms called Zetools. This can be used by traditional media companies to create and package their video content or in the future by users to effectively create their own media channels with rich interconnected supplementary content that can be aimed at monetization. The tools are aimed at media professionals who need an easier route to market over IPTV and broadband TV or PC. He takes us through a recent Telemundo ‘murder mystery’ project that used his tools to realise the project quickly. David finishes with advice on how to produce innovative content and differentiate yourself in the market place and achieve success. Such as Left/Right Brain – get all aspects of production working together. Blue Sky, reality, business, creative etc: Competitive analysis – how can you do it better? Candidate testing, peer review and baking in effective business models and much more.

PODCAST SUBSCRIPTION
All LAMP podcasts are also published through the iTunes store.

David Jensen’s 15 years of experience in the delivery of information, interactive media and entertainment has made him a leading member of many industries. He built and led Razorfish’s Broadband / Future Television practice, in addition to managing Razorfish’s Media and Entertainment practice for North America. Under his leadership, his team helped more than 100 media companies with technology, strategy and branding solutions. Clients include: Sony, Disney, DirecTV, I-Blast, News Corp, Fox, HBO, RAI, and Vivendi/Universal. He is currently head of business development for Zetools, an enterprise media company where he oversees all sales, marketing and alliances. Zetools systems enable rich media, multi-platform publishing, creative scheduling and flexible branding.

Prior to Razorfish, Mr. Jensen worked in the education sector creating interactive and community network initiatives for the world’s largest operating foundation, the J. Paul Getty Trust. Projects ranged from building community networks to launching broadband and interactive television channels for education. David has also produced and designed films, music videos, interactive media and television for HBO, MTV, Universal, PBS, Fox and Alive, among others. Mr. Jensen holds a M. Arch. from Harvard University and a B.Sc. from the University of Houston.

Perth 8 May 2006
Click to listen

Dec 202005
 

Networked Television – William Cooper
William CooperWilliam takes us on a journey into both a converged and diverged world as TV becomes just another string of content over global broadband networks. He looks at the emerging and dying business models as fiber optics become the norm to carry vast quantities of digital content around the world – the global markets. In a world where some netowrks can carry 17 million DVD quality video streams simultaneously, what are the opportunities and what kinds of services will we see.

PODCAST SUBSCRIPTION
All LAMP podcasts are also published through the iTunes store. You can subscribe automatically to these if you have iTunes installed by clicking here.

A specialist in interactive media services across multiple platforms, Dr. William Cooper advises clients ranging from start-up companies to major corporations, providing a practical operational perspective and he runs a very informative news site at informitv.com. As head of interactive at BBC Broadcast, William operationally managed the successful launch and delivery of landmark interactive services on satellite, terrestrial and cable television across multiple channels and territories. William was responsible for transitioning interactive publication and playout services from a public services cost centre into a profitable commercial subsidiary. This involved managing the migration of services into a purpose-built multimillion-pound technical facility in preparation for the subsequent sale of the business for 166 million. Previously, as head of new media operations, William oversaw the exponential growth of the BBC’s online services.

AGSM Sydney 05 Dec 2005
Click to listen
Audio preparation by James Christopher Murty

Oct 162005
 

Residential mentors October 2005 Lab

Below are the mentors that took part in the Victor Harbour residential LAMP Lab from 9-14 October 2005

Catherine Gleeson- Interaction Designer

Catherine GleesonCatherine has been working as a Creative Director in print and new media since 1988. She has extensive experience in information design and visual communication. Her projects include: creative direction of visitor multimedia for the National Gallery of Victoria’s (NGV), Centre for Australian Art at Federation Square.

Past work includes consultation, creative direction and design on local and international projects for clients such as: the National Geographic (Washington); the Smithsonian Institute (Washington); the American Museum of Natural History (New York); Foster’s Brewing Group; Lonely Planet and ANZ.

Through her company Platform09, Catherine also maintains a separate creative practice. Past projects have included: collaborative, installation work for Experimental; motion graphics, animation and multimedia design for theatre, film and video.

Christy Dena – Transmedia Storyteller

Christy DenaChristy is a world wide, leading practitioner and researcher in cross-media narrative, new media types and their creative application in emerging media. In this area she has contributed numerous articles and reviews to publications such as Australian Book Review, ABC Arts Online and RealTime.

Christy’s work has been referred to in The Age, Encore and in a recent report delivered at the European Commission DG Information Society. Her published articles have covered game-play, artificial intelligence and new narrative forms and she has written creative works for TV, theatre and multi-platform. Christy’s latest visionary work ‘The Villager Girl and the Teenbot’ bridges the gap between print and online chatbot technology.

In 1993 she was nominated for ‘Young Business Person of the Year’ and shortly after worked as a digital effects/TVC producer, business director and web developer. In 2002 she gained a postgraduate diploma in Creative Writing and is currently a Ph.D.candidate in New Media at the School of Creative Arts, Uni of Melbourne. She also teaches new media arts theory at Melbourne and Swinburne Universities, is on the Editorial Committee of New Antigone (a fully refereed international journal), co-edits a renowned site on new media arts, www.WriterResponseTheory.org, and runs a popular research blog, www.crossmediastorytelling.com.

Gary Hayes, Director LAMP@AFTRS

Gary HayesGary Hayes has been at the forefront of worldwide emerging media development and production since 1993. After joining the BBC in London as an editor he quickly moved on to lead the BBC’s development of the internet, interactive TV and emerging platforms from 95-04 as Senior Producer and Development Manager. The BBC grew from a linear broadcaster to world leader in cross-platform services during this period.

Gary devised & produced many of the BBC’s ‘firsts’ – Digital Text, the first broadcast interactive TV service – ‘Nomad’ the first live internet documentary – ‘X-Creatures’ the first broadband TV service and in ’96 introduced the first video and audio onto the BBC’s internet sites. He also produced and devised over 20 other eTV and broadband TV services including Top of the Pops, Travel Show, State Apart and several future BBC cross-platform navigators. Gary created numerous courses and seminars on Interactive thinking for linear producers and was a leading part of BBC strategy teams from 2001 in preparing for on-demand, cross-platform services. He also chaired the Business Models Group from 99-03 for TV-Anytime (the lead media-on-demand standards body).

Living & consulting in the US during 2004 he line produced Showtime’s PVR enhanced L-Word, as part of AFI digital labs and devised a range of new on-demand program formats for two national TV networks. Gary also produced & chaired conferences around LA including Hollywood industry panel seminars and Digital Days both looking at emerging media super-distribution models. He has presented at over fifty major international conferences and written several consultancy papers including US Interactive TV Advertising and more recently a report for the DTI on Personal Video Enablers for the UK media industry. He runs a blog on Media Personalisation at www.personalizemedia.com and an Interactive producers site at www.garyhayes.tv.

A specialist in personalised digital TV over broadcast and broadband networks Gary evangelises on the empowerment potential of non-passive media. As a published music producer, composer and performer he has had over 200 works performed live and on TV and Radio. Gary ran his own music production business from 1984-89 and is currently working on several film scores.

Jackie Turnure, Non-linear storyteller

Jackie TurnureWith script editing and writing experience in both traditional and new media, Jackie Turnure brings a unique perspective to the role of narrative in cross media production. For the last 15 years she has been working across film, television, games and online production, with a particular focus on animation and children