Apr 022009
 

Ozdox, the The Australian Documentary Forum and The Australian Director’s Guild in association with AFTRS supported by Metroscreen and Sydney Film School presents:

The Documentary Distribution Dilemma

online_kid

What online video can and cannot deliver, and why filmmakers need to understand it NOW!

  • Date: THURS 9 April 2009 – 6.30pm for 7pm
  • Venue: AFTRS Theatre 130 Bent St The Entertainment Quarter, Moore Park
  • $5 at the door (no reservations)
  • The Ozdox website is www.ozdox.org – register to be notified of seminars by email.

This special OzDox session, produced by Sensory Image, will explore new technologies and online video festival and multi-channel distribution sites (e.g.  raindance.tv). It will gaze into the crystal ball for documentary filmmakers, in the new climate of ABC and SBS online streaming. It will bring together experts and filmmakers to examine the impact of VOD upon our work, our pocketbooks and our futures.

Video online has been developing for a number of years and has now gained a large following and a big press. From You Tube to the ABC,  increasing numbers of people are uploading and downloading increasing amounts of material, and filmmakers have an imperative need to understand the rapidly evolving online environment.

At this point, Video-on-Demand is relatively underused but Hollywood and TV networks alike are looking toward VOD as a complementary distribution platform, and it is about to take off. As the educational market is also moving towards VOD, documentary DVD sales will also affected — perhaps even replaced. Significantly, VOD revenues are currently around $1.5 billion and are predicted to reach $5 billion in two years — and it’s only the beginning…

Special Guests:

With Overseas Guests (via video):

  • Elliot Grove and Zara Ballantyne Grove – www.raindance.tv
  • Nick Ware – Managing Director – Joining The Docs in UK

Among the issues we will be addressing are…

  • What is the actual state of online development today?
  • What do filmmakers need to know about online – technically, creatively and in terms of marketing and delivery to audiences?
  • What do we need to change in the way we plan and make our films?
  • Is online delivery a viable alternative to DVD distribution?
  • Where can filmmakers go to make a return on investment in the online forum?
  • There will also be time for those attending the seminar to ask questions of the panel.

Guests bios:

Robert Hutchinson – Head of New Media & Digital Services Interface stream, ABC

As Head of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s New Media & Digital Services Interface stream, Robert is responsible for the visual presentation and ease of use of digital content and services on the website, broadband service and other digital platforms. Robert is also Creative Director of ABC2, the ABC’s new digital TV channel. His current role includes developing broadband and digital television strategies and initiatives for the corporation. Robert has been working in the multi-media and Internet industries since 1995 in a variety of roles including new media arts practitioner, web designer and business analyst. He has been responsible for establishing Internet ventures for major advertising and media companies including Saatchi & Saatchi
(Wellington) and The Radio Network (NZ). Robert also works as an independent film producer and director.

Chris Gilbey OAM – www.perceptric.com and www.vquence.com.au

One of the leading visionaries in Australian Media and Technology, Chris consults on business strategy with particular regard to the impact of P2P technologies on media through Perceptric Pty Limited. As CEO of Lake Technology (ASX) he successfully led the company to a sale to Dolby Laboratories (NYSE), and subsequently consulted to Dolby’s Consumer Division on global consumer strategy. With 20 years in the Australian Music Industry, Chris led the development of the first transactional web site for CDs at BMG, as well as the development of the enhanced CD. Founding chairman of the Australian Music Industry‚Äôs charity, the Golden Stave Foundation, and founding chairman of Export Music Australia, Chris received the Order of Australia for his contribution to the music industry and charity.

Elliot Grove – Raindance

Founder of Raindance Film Festival in 1993, the British Independent Film Awards in 1998, and Raindance.TV in 2007, Elliot has produced over 150 short films and 5 feature films.  He teaches writers and producers in the UK, Europe, Japan and America. He has written three books which have become industry standards: BEGINNERS GUIDE TO MAKING IT IN FILM (Barrons 2009), RAINDANCE WRITERS LAB 2nd Edition (Focal Press 2008) and RAINDANCE PRODUCERS LAB (2004).

Zara Ballantyne-Grove – Raindance.tv

Zara managed the 2006 Nokia Shorts competition as well as the creation of mobile assets for the popular CSI franchise. She currently manages the licensing of content for Raindance.tv and supervises the scheduling and delivery of films to over 10 distribution partners. London-based Raindance.tv streams off-beat shorts, features and documentaries worldwide over 10 media platforms. In the last five months, over 300,000 people have already watched raindance.tv.

Aug 082006
 

Get in the Car
Tagline: Get in the Car! with Zeit-guide Monica Main and allow her to chauffeur you out of the cul de sacs of life towards the broader, more luscious landscapes of the bent mind.
LAMP Lab: July 2006

LAMP IV Photo C Gleeson
Target platforms: Internet, mobile phone, heritage media and IPTV
Project description: Getinthecar.com.au hosts the wonderful and hilarious world of me, Monni Log and all my alter egos who are hell bent on driving you to humorous enlightenment.

LAMP IVWelcome to my kitchen and as you can see my kitchen table is cluttered with all the detritus of the everyday. Sorry it’s a bit messy but at least it’s a sign of life. Go for a roam over the different objects and they will come “alive”, including the TV, the teacup, the teapot, recipe cards and handyhints. Click on the TV and catch up with a two minute episode of The Adventures of Zsa Zsa Lahore, the ravenous, red blooded redhead on her escapades of looking for love, herself and the meaning of life. Download them to your mobile and you have a portable soap opera, excellent for amusing your friends.

Submit your own life/relationship worst moments for consideration and let me turn them into a two minute techno colour reality. Enjoying the dramalette characters so much? Click on the mobile phone and download my MMS’; hilarious 5 sec picture messages you can send to you friends. Eg. “You’re late”, “You’re dropped”, “You’re GORGARSE!”, “Mum says…stop downloading”. Like I say, let me do the talking. And of course, download a ring tone that’s bound to embarrass you in the bank queue, eg The Strangled Cat, Maniacal Laughter, Boo Hoo.

LAMP IV

Click on the teacup and get a new twist on having your tea leaves read; a witty daily aphorism, eg Deep down your really shallow. Click on the handy hints and recipe files and get ideas on food for thought and thoughtful food. Looking for answers? Submit your own gardening, social ettiquette or cooking questions and let me or my alter egos provide the enlightenment. Too busy to visit getinthecar.com.au? Subscribe to our mobile phone information services and get Big Red’s 2-3min Cooking Classes with new recipes every week. Gardening problems? Subscribe to the Plant Police and Monni’s bogan twin sister Sharon will investigate and problem solve all your gardening dilemmas. Through internet, mobile phone, podcast or digital TV interact with Monni Log and her friends who are here to coach you from the sidelines in modern life. A world of absurd fun, sassy syntax, tacky merchandising, camp MMS’ and ridiculous ring tones… GET IN THE CAR! and let’s drive to enlightenment.

LAMP IV

LAMP IV

Team Members
Monica Main– Producer
Fran Tinley– Producer
Guardian mentor: Catherine Gleeson
Monica Main and Fran Tinley © 2006

Aug 072006
 

Immersion: Designing Experience © Gary Hayes 2006.

The fourth of 8 podcasts recorded live during the LAMP lab on Milson Island, Sydney in July 2006 – in front of the eight teams and ten mentors developing emerging media projects.

gary hayes“think of the experience, not just the service, the differentiators between professionals, thats you, versus users is that you should be very adept at creating user experiences versus creating individual pieces of content. I don’t think users in the future will be creating rich interconnected narratives across platforms and time”

Gary gives an informal and demo rich (hence a few breaks) talk about how to design pervasive entertainment, user experiences. By briefly looking at the eight areas below, using it as a rough framework, he attempts to dissect the interactive experience. He uses a range of examples from interactive services he helped create or produce such as X-Creatures, Top of the Pops, The L Word and virtual environments in Second Life through to games such as Indigo Prophecy and cross-media services including Da Vinci Code. He refers to the importance of flow and making sure the scale of the experience doesn’t feel limited by allowing viewers to take part in the creation process itself.

1 SCALE:
…of the experience. The size of the screen and the amount of story world to explore has enormous impacts on immersion – as well as the detail of individual objects within the ‘world’.
Ask: How big is my story world?

2. ESCAPISM (play)
In terms of building ‘play’ – it should be as fun making it as doing it.Today the experience author has to create tools for play, rather than fixed media and fixed routes through it. Randomness can go someway there – but for true immersion through play, give people tools to create their own variants of your property.
Ask: Can users really play in my creation?

3. SENSES
…the amount of senses that are engaged by an experience gives it the most potential for immersion. Make sure as well as intellectual and emotional engagement you consider sounds and the aesthetics of visual grammar and simm (simultaneous media usage). On a social network level – be aware that humans are extremely aware of
machine vs human interaction.
Ask: Are the visuals and audio truly rich and compelling?

4. PERSPECTIVE
…does the story or narrative engage? This is obvious, if there is nothing for you to be drawn along by (even your own story in some cases) then you will switch off. Put your audience inside the protagonist’s head.
Ask: How can I get the user to ‘empathise’ and BE a story world character

5. SERENDIPITY
…how the world or show you are watching has elements of surprise. The more scripted and formulaic the less immersive. An unspoilt new film at the cinema can surprise, social networks are and should be as unpredictable as life, sadly ‘most’ TV and pop-music are at the other end of the scale.
Ask: Do I really have anything that will surprise?

6. TEMPORALITY

How real time does the experience feel? Are you swept along by real time events, that are part of a social network and also are your choices taking place when you want them to. Sometimes on-demand is far less compelling than real time, online game and social network.
Ask: How ‘live’ does the service feel?

7. PERSONALIZATION

How much can you minutely affect the world and yourself in it? How much will the world reflect you for being there? Most importantly, how much of your real world personality can you bring with you into the experience. It is all about making the world feel like you belong – and TOOLS, TOOLS, TOOLS
Ask: Is each user given an individual user journey, can they roll their own?

8. RESONANCE AND CHOICE

How much control or agency do you have over the experience? Are your actions permanent and seen by all? Can you really do and say what you want – freedom of choice. True resonance is like a virtuous circle, you do something and there is a response that forever changes the environment. Like real life.
Ask: Can my service change based on user input?

He also mentions that having embedded social networks inside you experience is as important as any content you may think of including in your user experience project –
“think of your service as a tool, think of it as a place to play”.

For more background on this presentation check out Gary’s blog Immersion: Ambient TV, Addictive MMORPG

and to download the 2.2MB PDF of the presentation click here

PODCAST SUBSCRIPTION
All LAMP podcasts are also published through the iTunes store.

GARY HAYES – Interaction Producer & Director LAMP@AFTRS

Gary Hayes has been at the forefront of worldwide emerging media development and production since 1993. After joining the BBC in London as an editor he quickly moved on to lead the BBC’s development of the internet, interactive TV and emerging platforms from 95-04 as Senior Producer and Development Manager. The BBC grew from a linear broadcaster to world leader in cross-platform services during this period.

Gary devised & produced many of the BBC’s ‘firsts’ – Digital Text, the first broadcast interactive TV service – ‘Nomad’ the first live internet documentary – ‘X-Creatures’ the first broadband TV service and in ‘96 introduced the first video and audio onto the BBC’s internet sites. He also produced and devised over 20 other eTV and broadband TV services including Top of the Pops, Travel Show, State Apart and several future BBC cross-platform navigators. Gary created numerous courses and seminars on Interactive thinking for linear producers, was active in the Imagineering and R&D depts and was a leading part of BBC strategy teams from 2001 in preparing for on-demand, cross-platform services. He also chaired the Business Models Group from 99-03 for TV-Anytime (the lead media-on-demand standards body).

Living & consulting in the US during 2004 he line produced Showtime’s PVR enhanced L-Word, as part of AFI digital labs and devised a range of new on-demand program formats for two national TV networks. Gary also produced & chaired conferences around LA including Hollywood industry panel seminars and Digital Days both looking at emerging media super-distribution models. He has presented at over fifty major international conferences and written several consultancy papers including US Interactive TV Advertising and more recently a report for the DTI on Personal Video Enablers for the UK media industry. He runs a blog on Media Personalisation, Digital Business and Creativity at www.personalizemedia.com

Gary is also currently exploring the potential of shared social online virtual spaces for collaborative production, creativity and education. A specialist in personalised digital TV over broadcast and broadband networks Gary evangelises on the empowerment potential of non-passive media. As a published music producer, composer and performer he has had over 200 works performed live and on TV and Radio.

Sydney 3 July 2006 – Time 27:26. Click to listen

Jul 252006
 

Evolving Technology, where will your audience be? © Jonathan Marshall 2006.

The second of 8 podcasts recorded live during the LAMP lab on Milson Island, Sydney in July 2006 – in front of the eight teams and ten mentors developing emerging media projects. International mentor Jonathan talks about new technologies and how we engage audiences with them.
jonathan marshall“Choose the platform based on the audience and their likely location. Think about how each user will move between each platform and don’t choose a platform just for the sake of it”

After an entertaining rope trick showing how TV, mobile and broadband penetration will invert itself over the next few years Jonathan continues by looking at the technological transitions that are taking place at the moment. He looks at the emerging cross-over potential of TV and PC becoming IPTV, of TV and Mobile becoming DVB-H (one flavour of mobile TV) and ‘download’ possibilities as mobiles become as powerful as current PC’s.

Jonathan investigates the shift and flattening of audience demand for content as multicast becomes unicast – traditional broadcast turns into personalised individually available global streamed channels and pots of content over peer-to-peer networks. He asks the age old question is broadcast dead and says it will always have a place from a pure distribution efficiency perspective and shows how it will fit into the three way mix of broadband, broadcast and mobile networks. He ends by talking about future devices and how storage will be ubiquitous and the tools to find content to put onto that storage will become absolutely critical. (During the q&a session there is a discussion about the transition from broadband to PC to IPTV and how broadcasters and telecos are preparing for the fight ahead).

PODCAST SUBSCRIPTION
All LAMP podcasts are also published through the iTunes store.

JONATHAN MARSHALL

Jonathan Marshall is one of the key technical strategists in the field of interactive TV, having led the development of the BBC’s first groundbreaking services on DTT and Digital Satellite. Jonathan started his career at the BBC in 1991 as a recording engineer for BBC Scotland. He then left to complete a degree in Electronics and Music followed by a Masters in French and Management. By combining these skills he worked in Paris for IRCAM designing and implementing Digital Music Workstations for contemporary composers and performers to use.Jonathan rejoined the BBC in 1996 working firstly on DAB and then Digital Television for the Research and Development department at Kingswood Warren. It was here that he developed the world’s first interactive TV broadcasts in MHEG. In 1999 Jonathan joined the newly created BBC Interactive TV department at Bush House, where he worked with the technical team in delivering a whole raft of services, including the BAFTA award winning Wimbledon Interactive and Digital Text services on the Sky Platform. This work cemented his reputation as one of the key technical strategists in the interactive TV field. Jonathan went on to become BBC Interactive TV’s main technical interface for all third party providers, testing and appraising their products, giving him an unrivalled knowledge of the interactive TV tools market.

Jonathan now works as a freelance Technical Development Producer working with a range of new media companies from start-ups to multi-nationals. As part of his work he delivers training courses both within the BBC and around the world to enable content producers to deliver world class interactive services using the latest technical innovations.

Sydney 4 July 2006 – Time 20:54. PDF (191k) of presentation
Click to listen

Audio edit, description and mp3 prep/post  – G Hayes

May 222006
 

Disruption, Changing Audiences and New Business Models © Duane Varan 2006.

Recorded live and unedited during the LAMP lab in Perth in May 2006 in front of the seven teams developing emerging media projects. Length 51 minutes.

Duane Varan“The best thing you can do as content producers is to break your dependency on the Australian market, a very hard thing to do, but you have got to do it to remain in step with the global economy”. Duane Varan talks about the market disruption facing the current TV industry from a range of perspectives including the advertiser, broadcaster, independent producer and the audiences. Looking at other disruptive technologies over the last 50 years he talks about the implications of remote control, timeshifting, interactive TV and video-on-demand then highlights the blunt instruments used at the moment to measure TV viewing. The economic paradigm of TV is shifting, economies of scale no longer work and value is now about producing different goods across platforms and creating engagement.

Duane suggests that the challenge now is about programme promotion, getting your content into the box or the portal and he continues by looking at recent research in how interactivity, especially interactive ads significantly increase engagement. Also touching on interactive storytelling he points out that advertisers not programme makers are way ahead and new business opportunities are being overlooked. In the q and a session he eloquently suggests the Australian market is irrelevant on the global stage to the big brands and that government protecting the status quo in Australia (denying disruption) is hindering real business development opportunities. Duane finishes by talking about global brands, IPTV and the future of the Australian industry.

PODCAST SUBSCRIPTION
All LAMP podcasts are also published through the iTunes store.

Professor Duane Varan is Director of the Interactive Television Research Institute at Murdoch University where he holds the Foundation Chair in New Media. Professor Varan is the recepient of a wide range of presitigous awards including the Australian Prime Miniter’s Award for University Teacher of the Year (2001), the Australian Award for University Teaching in Economics, Business and Related Studies (2001), a Texas Excellence in Teaching Award (1990) and an Asia-Pacfici ITT Award of Excellence in recognition of his contributions towards bridging the gap between business strategy, information technology and creative design. Professor Varan is a global authority on the nascent digital television industry. His clients include Procter and Gamble, Nike, Pizza Hut, the BBC, BSkyB (UK), TV Cabo (Portugal), Leo Burnett, Saatchi and Saatchi and other broadcasters, telcos, advertisers and global brands.

Perth 8 May 2006
Click to listen

Apr 112006
 

Producing Multi-Platform TVLAMP is involved in a one-day special event to be held at AFTRS on the 5th May called “Producing Multi-Platform TV”. A comprehensive look at cross-media and the current transformation of television in a multi-device and global multi-distribution world.

A line-up of top-level guest speakers will provide insights into producing interactive content for next generation television in Australia and overseas at a seminar at the Australian Film Television and Radio School (AFTRS) on Friday, 5 May 2006.

Keynote speaker, David Jensen is a recognised leader of the interactive television industry, having won two Primetime Emmy’s for Outstanding Achievement in Interactive Television (Viacom 2005 and ABC 2004) and seven Emmy nominations over the past four years.

Geof Heydon, Director, Innovation and Market Development for Alcatel Asia Pacific, will explore IPTV, explain what it really is and the strategic importance of this new capability that will transform TV based services. He will demonstrate some of the future converged entertainment options that combine TV, broadband and telecommunications elements.

A range of other Australian leading industry practitioners will provide valuable insights into how to plan for the revolution of digital television and explore opportunities it will present. For more details and to register online: click here

Dec 202005
 

Evolving Technology, Evolving Audiences – Jonathan Marshall
Jonathan MarshallJonathan talks about devices, the network pipes and the audiences that use them. Using the basic premise of lean back, forward and portable he advises us on how to shape the viewer experience through understanding of the mode of the audience. Speaking specifically to one of LAMP’s residential audiences he helps us identify the interactive jewel, the audience and the ideal experience. Jonathan finishes by showing how there is a certain convergence across devices that have similar capability, but still each has its unique place in viewer experience of interactive story.
Accompanying presentation “Evolving Technology, Evolving Audiences” – Jonathan Marshall, Technology Consultant – PDF

PODCAST SUBSCRIPTION
All LAMP podcasts are also published through the iTunes store. You can subscribe automatically to these if you have iTunes installed by clicking here.

Jonathan Marshall is one of the key technical strategists in the field of interactive TV, having led the development of the BBC�s first groundbreaking services on DTT and Digital Satellite. Jonathan started his career at the BBC in 1991 as a recording engineer for BBC Scotland. He then left to complete a degree in Electronics and Music followed by a Masters in French and Management. By combining these skills he worked in Paris for IRCAM designing and implementing Digital Music Workstations for contemporary composers and performers to use.

Jonathan rejoined the BBC in 1996 working firstly on DAB and then Digital Television for the Research and Development department at Kingswood Warren. It was here that he developed the world�s first interactive TV broadcasts in MHEG. In 1999 Jonathan joined the newly created BBC Interactive TV department at Bush House, where he worked with the technical team in delivering a whole raft of services, including the BAFTA award winning Wimbledon Interactive and Digital Text services on the Sky Platform. This work cemented his reputation as one of the key technical strategists in the interactive TV field. Jonathan went on to become BBC Interactive TV’s main technical interface for all third party providers, testing and appraising their products, giving him an unrivalled knowledge of the interactive TV tools market.

AGSM Sydney 06 Dec 2005
Click to listen
Audio preparation by James Christopher Murty

Oct 182005
 

South Australian film and digital media practitioners have banded together to create the Cross Platform Producers Group (CPPG).

Comprised of emerging and established producers who work across screen media platforms, the Group has come together to strengthen networks and help build a thriving screen media industry in South Australia.
With the rapid take-up of broadband, digital tv and other new media in Australia, the Group recognise that it is important to stay ahead of new advances in technology.
Emerging and new media allow for innovative approaches to developing both drama and documentary programs and South Australian practitioners are exploring how to develop interactive content for delivery via internet, television, cinema and mobile phones.

The Group was inspired to form after meeting earlier in 2005 with Adelaide Thinker in Residence Peter Wintonick. A major figure in the digital documentary arena, Wintonick has inspired a new generation of digital media filmmakers.
The Cross Platform Producers Group will share information, skills, opportunities and ideas. It will consolidate and develop networks with national and international bodies and work to raise the profile of SA based creative practitioners and producers.
The Group believe that the heartbeat of any successful screen industry is the local producers and will lobby that the state funds in screen production are focussed on local producers. They are taking a cue from successful models from Canada – where smaller states such as Nova Scotia have flourishing film and cross platform industries.
The Cross Platform Producers Group will ensure that South Australian creative producers stay in touch and informed and make the most of the exciting and rapidly evolving field of digital and interactive
filmmaking.

Cross Platform Producers Group – we make stuff. Now!!
For further information email crossplatform.sa@gmail.com

Oct 162005
 

Residential mentors October 2005 Lab

Below are the mentors that took part in the Victor Harbour residential LAMP Lab from 9-14 October 2005

Catherine Gleeson- Interaction Designer

Catherine GleesonCatherine has been working as a Creative Director in print and new media since 1988. She has extensive experience in information design and visual communication. Her projects include: creative direction of visitor multimedia for the National Gallery of Victoria’s (NGV), Centre for Australian Art at Federation Square.

Past work includes consultation, creative direction and design on local and international projects for clients such as: the National Geographic (Washington); the Smithsonian Institute (Washington); the American Museum of Natural History (New York); Foster’s Brewing Group; Lonely Planet and ANZ.

Through her company Platform09, Catherine also maintains a separate creative practice. Past projects have included: collaborative, installation work for Experimental; motion graphics, animation and multimedia design for theatre, film and video.

Christy Dena – Transmedia Storyteller

Christy DenaChristy is a world wide, leading practitioner and researcher in cross-media narrative, new media types and their creative application in emerging media. In this area she has contributed numerous articles and reviews to publications such as Australian Book Review, ABC Arts Online and RealTime.

Christy’s work has been referred to in The Age, Encore and in a recent report delivered at the European Commission DG Information Society. Her published articles have covered game-play, artificial intelligence and new narrative forms and she has written creative works for TV, theatre and multi-platform. Christy’s latest visionary work ‘The Villager Girl and the Teenbot’ bridges the gap between print and online chatbot technology.

In 1993 she was nominated for ‘Young Business Person of the Year’ and shortly after worked as a digital effects/TVC producer, business director and web developer. In 2002 she gained a postgraduate diploma in Creative Writing and is currently a Ph.D.candidate in New Media at the School of Creative Arts, Uni of Melbourne. She also teaches new media arts theory at Melbourne and Swinburne Universities, is on the Editorial Committee of New Antigone (a fully refereed international journal), co-edits a renowned site on new media arts, www.WriterResponseTheory.org, and runs a popular research blog, www.crossmediastorytelling.com.

Gary Hayes, Director LAMP@AFTRS

Gary HayesGary Hayes has been at the forefront of worldwide emerging media development and production since 1993. After joining the BBC in London as an editor he quickly moved on to lead the BBC’s development of the internet, interactive TV and emerging platforms from 95-04 as Senior Producer and Development Manager. The BBC grew from a linear broadcaster to world leader in cross-platform services during this period.

Gary devised & produced many of the BBC’s ‘firsts’ – Digital Text, the first broadcast interactive TV service – ‘Nomad’ the first live internet documentary – ‘X-Creatures’ the first broadband TV service and in ’96 introduced the first video and audio onto the BBC’s internet sites. He also produced and devised over 20 other eTV and broadband TV services including Top of the Pops, Travel Show, State Apart and several future BBC cross-platform navigators. Gary created numerous courses and seminars on Interactive thinking for linear producers and was a leading part of BBC strategy teams from 2001 in preparing for on-demand, cross-platform services. He also chaired the Business Models Group from 99-03 for TV-Anytime (the lead media-on-demand standards body).

Living & consulting in the US during 2004 he line produced Showtime’s PVR enhanced L-Word, as part of AFI digital labs and devised a range of new on-demand program formats for two national TV networks. Gary also produced & chaired conferences around LA including Hollywood industry panel seminars and Digital Days both looking at emerging media super-distribution models. He has presented at over fifty major international conferences and written several consultancy papers including US Interactive TV Advertising and more recently a report for the DTI on Personal Video Enablers for the UK media industry. He runs a blog on Media Personalisation at www.personalizemedia.com and an Interactive producers site at www.garyhayes.tv.

A specialist in personalised digital TV over broadcast and broadband networks Gary evangelises on the empowerment potential of non-passive media. As a published music producer, composer and performer he has had over 200 works performed live and on TV and Radio. Gary ran his own music production business from 1984-89 and is currently working on several film scores.

Jackie Turnure, Non-linear storyteller

Jackie TurnureWith script editing and writing experience in both traditional and new media, Jackie Turnure brings a unique perspective to the role of narrative in cross media production. For the last 15 years she has been working across film, television, games and online production, with a particular focus on animation and children