Apr 022009
 

Ozdox, the The Australian Documentary Forum and The Australian Director’s Guild in association with AFTRS supported by Metroscreen and Sydney Film School presents:

The Documentary Distribution Dilemma

online_kid

What online video can and cannot deliver, and why filmmakers need to understand it NOW!

  • Date: THURS 9 April 2009 – 6.30pm for 7pm
  • Venue: AFTRS Theatre 130 Bent St The Entertainment Quarter, Moore Park
  • $5 at the door (no reservations)
  • The Ozdox website is www.ozdox.org – register to be notified of seminars by email.

This special OzDox session, produced by Sensory Image, will explore new technologies and online video festival and multi-channel distribution sites (e.g.  raindance.tv). It will gaze into the crystal ball for documentary filmmakers, in the new climate of ABC and SBS online streaming. It will bring together experts and filmmakers to examine the impact of VOD upon our work, our pocketbooks and our futures.

Video online has been developing for a number of years and has now gained a large following and a big press. From You Tube to the ABC,  increasing numbers of people are uploading and downloading increasing amounts of material, and filmmakers have an imperative need to understand the rapidly evolving online environment.

At this point, Video-on-Demand is relatively underused but Hollywood and TV networks alike are looking toward VOD as a complementary distribution platform, and it is about to take off. As the educational market is also moving towards VOD, documentary DVD sales will also affected — perhaps even replaced. Significantly, VOD revenues are currently around $1.5 billion and are predicted to reach $5 billion in two years — and it’s only the beginning…

Special Guests:

With Overseas Guests (via video):

  • Elliot Grove and Zara Ballantyne Grove – www.raindance.tv
  • Nick Ware – Managing Director – Joining The Docs in UK

Among the issues we will be addressing are…

  • What is the actual state of online development today?
  • What do filmmakers need to know about online – technically, creatively and in terms of marketing and delivery to audiences?
  • What do we need to change in the way we plan and make our films?
  • Is online delivery a viable alternative to DVD distribution?
  • Where can filmmakers go to make a return on investment in the online forum?
  • There will also be time for those attending the seminar to ask questions of the panel.

Guests bios:

Robert Hutchinson – Head of New Media & Digital Services Interface stream, ABC

As Head of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s New Media & Digital Services Interface stream, Robert is responsible for the visual presentation and ease of use of digital content and services on the website, broadband service and other digital platforms. Robert is also Creative Director of ABC2, the ABC’s new digital TV channel. His current role includes developing broadband and digital television strategies and initiatives for the corporation. Robert has been working in the multi-media and Internet industries since 1995 in a variety of roles including new media arts practitioner, web designer and business analyst. He has been responsible for establishing Internet ventures for major advertising and media companies including Saatchi & Saatchi
(Wellington) and The Radio Network (NZ). Robert also works as an independent film producer and director.

Chris Gilbey OAM – www.perceptric.com and www.vquence.com.au

One of the leading visionaries in Australian Media and Technology, Chris consults on business strategy with particular regard to the impact of P2P technologies on media through Perceptric Pty Limited. As CEO of Lake Technology (ASX) he successfully led the company to a sale to Dolby Laboratories (NYSE), and subsequently consulted to Dolby’s Consumer Division on global consumer strategy. With 20 years in the Australian Music Industry, Chris led the development of the first transactional web site for CDs at BMG, as well as the development of the enhanced CD. Founding chairman of the Australian Music Industry‚Äôs charity, the Golden Stave Foundation, and founding chairman of Export Music Australia, Chris received the Order of Australia for his contribution to the music industry and charity.

Elliot Grove – Raindance

Founder of Raindance Film Festival in 1993, the British Independent Film Awards in 1998, and Raindance.TV in 2007, Elliot has produced over 150 short films and 5 feature films.  He teaches writers and producers in the UK, Europe, Japan and America. He has written three books which have become industry standards: BEGINNERS GUIDE TO MAKING IT IN FILM (Barrons 2009), RAINDANCE WRITERS LAB 2nd Edition (Focal Press 2008) and RAINDANCE PRODUCERS LAB (2004).

Zara Ballantyne-Grove – Raindance.tv

Zara managed the 2006 Nokia Shorts competition as well as the creation of mobile assets for the popular CSI franchise. She currently manages the licensing of content for Raindance.tv and supervises the scheduling and delivery of films to over 10 distribution partners. London-based Raindance.tv streams off-beat shorts, features and documentaries worldwide over 10 media platforms. In the last five months, over 300,000 people have already watched raindance.tv.

Jun 072006
 

Sexual Robots and Plastic Humans in Anime © Philip Brophy 2006.

As a prelude to a series of podcasts on the business, production and sociology of games, virtual shared worlds and MMORPGs

Presented by LAMP on behalf of AFTRS Centre for Screen Studies and Research.

Recorded live at AFTRS Main Theatre 2 June 2006 Click to listen

SEXUAL ROBOTS AND PLASTIC HUMANS IN ANIME
It is in bodily representation that anime heavily subscribes to a thesis of ‘post-humanism’ * the re-imaging, reinventing and reconfiguring of all we assume humanity and humanism to signify. The body in anime is aggregatively sculpted to create a contra-photographic, mega-ornamental, hyper-extended figure. Clean of any collaging of classical and archaic parts, the anime body is a new species, holistic in form and genetically manipulated according to anime*s encompassing of the history of human form as perceived within Japan.

Anime’s reliance on mannequinned form and its animation of multifarious guises, masks and faces presents the human as skeletal architecture, plasticized flesh and neural matrixes. Sublime in its post-humanism, anime tells the story of a human who dreamt of being a robot * and whose dream one day came true.

Sexual Robots

PODCAST SUBSCRIPTION
All LAMP podcasts are also published through the iTunes store.

PHILIP BROPHY – Filmmaker, sound designer, curator and academic

Philip’s Full CV

Philip Brophy is a filmmaker, sound designer, curator, and academic. His films include the experimental short feature Salt, Saliva, Sperm & Sweat in 1988 and feature film Body Melt in 1993. He designed the sound for the feature Mallboy as well as numerous shorts. Having created the Soundtrack stream in Media Arts at RMIT, Melbourne, he continues to lecture and present on film sound and music internationally. Brophy specializes in three distinct areas: (i) horror, sex & exploitation; (ii) film sound & music; and (iii) Japanese animation. He is widely published in all three areas internationally, and has curated numerous programmes for the Melbourne International Film Festival. He has written several books including 100 Modern Soundtracks for the British Film Institute, London. His most recent book is 100 Anime also for the BFI.

AFTRS 6 June 2006