Dec 142007
 

Don’t Just Sit Around this Christmas Holidays –
the next LAMP residential is just around the corner

Have you got what it takes to apply?

We are looking for six to eight professional teams with groundbreaking new media ideas to attend our leading R&D production lab from Feb 24 -29, 2008.

Facilitated by the AFTRS, the Laboratory for Advanced Media Production (LAMP) has run hundreds of workshops, seminars and live-in-residentials and developed over 54 projects. LAMP assists production teams in developing innovative emerging media projects including Sharing Web 2.0 Services, Advanced TV, 360 Entertainment, Serious Games and Social Virtual Worlds.

Over our six day LAMP residential, you and internationally recognised industry mentors live and work together in a creative hothouse environment for five days straight.

What a privilege! We were challenged to reach for and achieve
far reaching goals but were also totally supported in the endeavour
by a united team of razor sharp professionals.

You will experience engaging presentations from world class practitioners, evolve the business, technical and creative aspects of your project, and create a dynamic visual proof of concept.

This was a highly productive, intensive session
whereby all outside distractions
were eliminated letting us focus solely on the job

At the end of the residential you are given the opportunity to present your visual proof of concept to a panel of media industry experts, gaining invaluable feedback, insight and advice. Past panels have included representatives from the ABC, Bigpond, NineMSN, yahoo7, SBS, the AFC, Film Victoria, NSWFTO PFTC, Alcatel, Southern Star and Nickelodeon.

I was transformed and uplifted with new confidence,
a new sense of possibility

Our residentials work because participants get to accelerate their ideas rapidly from concept development through to proof of concept while being challenged by a wide range of ideas relevant to the growing creative industries sector.

The next LAMP Residential is being held in collaboration with the New Zealand Screen Council and is set to take place Sun 24 February – Fri 29 February, 2008 in Victoria.

This has definitely been one of the best experiences of my life.
Thankyou!

So get to work today on your application and getting a team together, so you don’t miss out being a part of the first LAMP residential for 2008.

Applications are open now and close on January 10, 2008
Go to www.storylabs.us/lamp/apply to see criteria and download an application form today

We are happy to receive submissions to attend the next lab in the following areas.

  • Advanced TV – Projects that are targeted to local ‘OpenTV-like’ interactive TV over satellite and cable TV (Foxtel and Sky New Zealand) with a mobile phone component. These can include synchronous enhanced TV alongside the programming, simple casual games or multi stream formats
  • Social Virtual Worlds – Rich story based virtual worlds that can be built in existing large 3D social multi user environments like Second Life, Multiverse or There.com. These must have a strong community aspect and include co-creative elements.
  • 360 Entertainment – Cross-media, collaborative play services. Often called Extended Entertainment or Alternate Reality Games these will be strong narratives played out across many websites, mobile, physical locations, TV and print. Themes are usually investigative and draw audiences into complex scavenger hunts that blur the line between fact or fiction.
  • Serious Games – Specifically interested in rich gameplay on consoles, pc or mobile that delivers real learning. The range can be short form flash/sms type games that require brief periods of play spread over many weeks or continuous online games that involve collaboration with others in Massively Multiplayer Online Game (MMOG) environments.
  • Sharing Web 2.0 – Applications and services that draw together communities on web and mobile with the purpose of sharing and growing around a niche interest. This could be mash-ups of iconic web 2.0 services such as flickr, YouTube, Facebook or something completely new and original that will activate key interest groups.
Oct 302007
 

Screen Council New Zealand logoWe are now accepting applications for the eighth LAMP Residential Lab being held in collaboration with sponsors New Zealand Screen Council. We welcome project submissions from project teams in all areas of the media industry and the final selection will a mix of teams from New Zealand and Australia.

Presented by AFTRS, The eighth LAMP Residential Lab is a unique opportunity to evolve your project for broadband, mobile devices, advanced television, games consoles, multi-user virtual environments and beyond.

It is an intensive lab where teams and mentors work together for 5 days to produce a proof of concept for a new media service and present it to industry VIP visitors on the final day. The lab will take place in late February 2008 and the location in Victoria will be confirmed in the coming weeks.

Please click on the ‘How to Apply‘ link above for full details and the application form and we are happy to receive submissions to attend the next lab in the following areas (or hybrids of).

  • Advanced Interactive TV – Projects that are targeted to local ‘OpenTV-like’ interactive TV over satellite and cable TV (Foxtel and Sky New Zealand) with a mobile phone component. These can include synchronous enhanced TV alongside the programming, simple casual games or multi stream formats
  • Social Virtual Worlds – Rich story based virtual worlds that can be built in existing large 3D social multi user environments like Second Life, Multiverse or There.com. These must have a strong community aspect and include co-creative elements.
  • 360 Entertainment – Cross-media, collaborative play services. Often called Extended Entertainment or Alternate Reality Games these will be strong narratives played out across many websites, mobile, physical locations, TV and print. Themes are usually investigative and draw audiences into complex scavenger hunts that blur the line between fact or fiction.
  • Serious Games – Specifically interested in rich gameplay on consoles, pc or mobile that delivers real learning. The range can be short form flash/sms type games that require brief periods of play spread over many weeks or continuous online games that involve collaboration with others in Massively Multiplayer Online Game (MMOG) environments.
  • Sharing Web 2.0 – Applications and services that draw together communities on web and mobile with the purpose of sharing and growing around a niche interest. This could be mash-ups of iconic web 2.0 services such as flickr, YouTube, Facebook or something completely new and original that will activate key interest groups.

We hope, if selected, that you will find the process illuminating and informative and that the real-world focus for your ideas will be transformed.

Sep 122006
 

Presented by AFTRS LAMP. How are virtual worlds developing and what are the opportunities for media creatives?

Luke Carruthers is a games developer who runs a company called Imaginary Numbers in Sydney. The company creates online games and their first title Tactica Online is a fast-moving strategy RPG set amidst conspiracy and intrigue of Da Vinci’s world.  Luke Carruthers’ first company, Magna Data, was founded in 1993, and went on to become one of Australia’s most successful early Internet service providers. Sold in 1999 for A$16 million, it was noted for its innovative services, including operating one of the country’s first DSL broadband networks. Since then he has founded three more companies, all focused on the Internet and telecommunications market, including Inter-touch, an in-hotel network operator recently acquired by NTT DoCoMo for US$70 million, and Alterna Telecom, which provided wholesale PSTN switching services and was acquired by RSLCom in 2002. Secretary of the Internet Industry Association from 1995 to 2001, and joining the board of the Game Developers Association of Australia in 2005, he has also worked with numerous government and industry bodies aiding in the development of the legislative and regulatory framework for the telecommunications, media, and entertainment industries.

Summary of the presentation

Using World of Warcraft and Second Life as examples at both ends of the spectrum of social online games Luke talks about environment design, demographics and game-play competitive structures of these services. He differentiates between role playing competitive games and sand-box environments of virtual worlds and talks in great detail about the motivations of game players and the social drivers of MMORPGs. Luke also addresses issues of self-policing and trust based social networks that spring up naturally in these environments referring to the griefers who try to upset the narrative/gameplay of other and the groups of guardians that try to reduce this irritation. In contrast he talks about the virtual world of Second Life as a game with no rules, goals or driving narrative. The economics and the fact that upto 50% of inhabitants of ‘worlds’ tend to be more socially outgoing females as opposed to the 15-30% in ‘games’ are used as part of the differentiation discussion. Luke talks about the way players communicate in worlds and how games such as Final Fantasy XI one has english and japanese speakers thrown together and how emotes and symbols are used more in those cases.

Luke then talks at length about the film/game business and production cross overs and how now films like Avatar is being created as a film and online game simultaneously. With costs of $64 mill for WoW the budgets are similar to major features with around $60mill in profit each month. He says that games took 20 years to reach a $10bill industry in the US whereas film took 90 years to get to the same level. The skills required for games creation are similar to film fx and in the US film students have a lot more game ‘education’ than in Australia. Luke sayd that this money is made mostly throught the dominant model of subscription and pays for the designers, producers, artists and programmers that form the four divisions of most games publishers. An interesting aspect of MMORPG production is the cultural differences in that Final Fantasy for example, which is predominantly and Eastern game, has around 75% passive cinematics (or linear video) and 25% actual interactive gameplay. He talks about the potential cross over in skills between traditional film and game production citing cinematographers, writers, composers, set and production designers have a role to play, whereas editors are more focused on the cinematic creation. Luke suggests it is only in the past year or so that how a scene is presented to the player is important and that is promising for traditional film creators especially lighting design which is going through enormous growth at the moment.

Luke finishes this insightful presentation by talking about the future and how AI will take a more dominant role as the next generation of SIMs type games come to the fore and emotional expression, realistic body language and character/personality will mean it becomes harder and harder to tell the difference between human or machine controlled avatars. The final element of the talk is about the ethical, control and moral dimensions of game access as well as the things Luke sees will make the difference between games and film blur to the Nth degree.

AFTRS Sydney 5 Sept 2006 – Time 57:46. Click to listen

PODCAST SUBSCRIPTION
All LAMP podcasts are also published through the iTunes store.

This presentation was highly interactive with lots of questions and has been edited to provide reasonable continuity.

Audio edited and processed by Gary Hayes.

Aug 172006
 

indigi-nous
Tagline: “Learn about Aboriginal Australia through interactive experience”
LAMP Lab: July 2006
Target platforms: Broadband PC, cards, DVD and mobile
Project description: Designed as a cross media and cross platform experience for primary school aged children, ‘Totemon’ is an interactive locative and online game, a dvd game, and has a trading card, quest element. Informed by Aboriginal culture, it is an immerse learning environment, the user finding stuff about Australia’s unique and special places, people, plants and animals, totems and tucker.

LAMP IV

LAMP IV

LAMP IV

LAMP IV

Team Members (indigi-nous)
Geoff Ferguson – Producer
Catherine Vogan – Designer
Joe Hurst
Jason Ramp

Guardian mentor: Keren Flavell and Sherilee Saul
indigi-nous © 2006